Banning books in schools (1 Viewer)

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    Optimus Prime

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    Excellent article I thought deserved its own thread
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    On the surface, it would appear that book censors and censored authors like myself can agree on one thing: Books are powerful.

    Particularly books for children and teens.

    Why else would people like me spend so much time and energy writing them?

    Why else would censors spend so much time and energy trying to keep them out of kids’ hands?

    In a country where the average adult is reading fewer and fewer books, it’s a surprise to find Americans arguing so much about them.

    In this election year, parents and politicians — so many politicians — are jumping into the fray to say how powerful books can be.

    Granted, politicians often make what I do sound like witchcraft, but I take this as a compliment.

    I’ll admit, one of my first thoughts about the current wildfire of attempted censorship was: How quaint.

    Conservatives seemed to be dusting off their playbook from 1958, when the only way our stories could get to kids was through schools and libraries.

    While both are still crucial sanctuaries for readers, they’re hardly the only options. Plenty of booksellers supply titles that are taken off school shelves.

    And words can be very widely shared free of charge on social media and the rest of the internet. If you take my book off a shelf, you keep it away from that shelf, but you hardly keep it away from readers.

    As censorship wars have raged in so many communities, damaging the lives of countless teachers, librarians, parents and children, it’s begun to feel less and less quaint.

    This is not your father’s book censorship…..

    Here’s something I never thought I’d be nostalgic for: sincere censors. When my first novel, “Boy Meets Boy,” was published in 2003, it was immediately the subject of many challenges, some of which kept the book from ever getting on a shelf in the first place.

    At the time, a challenge usually meant one parent trying to get a book pulled from a school or a library, going through a formal process.

    I often reminded myself to try to find some sympathy for these parents; yes, they were wrong, and their desire to control what other people in the community got to read was wrong — but more often than not, the challenge was coming from fear of a changing world, a genuine (if incorrect) belief that being gay would lead kids straight to ruination and hell, and/or the misbegotten notion that if all the books that challenged the (homophobic, racist) status quo went away, then the status quo would remain intact.

    It was, in some ways, as personal to them as it was to those of us on the other side of the challenge.

    And nine times out of 10, the book would remain on the shelf.

    It’s not like that now. What I’ve come to believe, as I’ve talked to authors and librarians and teachers, is that attacks are less and less about the actual books.

    We’re being used as targets in a much larger proxy war.

    The goal of that war isn’t just to curtail intellectual freedom but to eviscerate the public education system in this country.

    Censors are scorching the earth, without care for how many kids get burned.

    Racism and homophobia are still very much present, but it’s also a power grab, a money grab. The goal for many is a for-profit, more authoritarian and much less diverse culture, one in which truth is whatever you’re told it is, your identity is determined by its acceptability and the past is a lie that the future is forced to emulate.

    The politicians who holler and post and draw up their lists of “harmful” books aren’t actually scared of our books.

    They are using our books to scare people.

     
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    I have heard that argument before. I don't buy. I fail to see how and why erotic literature would help a person struggling with sexual frustration/identity during puberty.

    That's okay, you don't have to buy it or read it. You also don't get to make anybody's choice to read that book for them, even 15 year olds.
     
    Nobody is stopping parents from controlling what their kids read. The real question is why do you want to control what other peoples’ kids read?
    Are you not advocating for parents to not have a say in what is in the library over the recommendations of 'expert' librarians? You are.
    Do you think Playboy should be allowed in school libraries? Obviously you do by your stance that all things should be available in all libraries. What about erotic literature? Those are books. We can't ban those either, correct?
     
    That's okay, you don't have to buy it or read it. You also don't get to make anybody's choice to read that book for them, even 15 year olds.
    What about 12 year olds (7th grade)? Do you think they should read that book?
     
    Are you not advocating for parents to not have a say in what is in the library over the recommendations of 'expert' librarians? You are.
    Do you think Playboy should be allowed in school libraries? Obviously you do by your stance that all things should be available in all libraries. What about erotic literature? Those are books. We can't ban those either, correct?
    Parents have always been able to opt out - I have never advocated for parents losing control. You, however, are doing exactly that. You want to replace parental control with your control. You want to decide for everyone else.
     
    What about 12 year olds (7th grade)? Do you think they should read that book?

    They probably shouldn't, but I wouldn't make any laws against it. If a parent feels that book would help their 12-year old that is struggling with their sexuality, then they should be allowed to let their child read it.

    I don't have a problem with having age restriction and requiring parental consent for below those ages to check out books if they have explicit/sexual content in them. That's different from banning a book outright.
     
    I have a 12 year old 7th grader.

    I have no problem at all if she wanted to read that book. She read way worse. So has my 14 year old - who is doing a speech on the murder of the Fred Hampton for her speech and debate class. She's trying to go to Stanford Law. A speech in the south she wouldn't be able to give because of the CRT nonsense.

    But I believe my kids are not stupid and may just be curious about the world and the people in it.

    And they are in middle and high school. If you don't think middle schoolers talk about this stuff you have never had kids.

    Now if there was a Bible in the school, I would lose my shirt! That thing is full of rape, incest, infanticide and murder of innocent people. Plus it is just so unbelievable.
     
    Are you not advocating for parents to not have a say in what is in the library over the recommendations of 'expert' librarians? You are.
    Do you think Playboy should be allowed in school libraries? Obviously you do by your stance that all things should be available in all libraries. What about erotic literature? Those are books. We can't ban those either, correct?
    Correct, someone elses parent should not a have a say so on what other children read based soley because of thier opinion. which is 99% of what the book banning are.
    I have no doudt that if they put on a ballot to give permission to a certain board or group to have the authority to ban books they deem inappropraite, it would fail miserably..
    How many playboys are in libraries today? smh. terrible comparison. All these people who want to ban a book that hurts white straight people's feelings are the same ones that yell about the 'pussification' of America.
     
    Parents have always been able to opt out - I have never advocated for parents losing control. You, however, are doing exactly that. You want to replace parental control with your control. You want to decide for everyone else.
    Ok.
    What is view on "50 Shades of Grey"? Should that be in the 7th grade libraries as well?
     
    US parents would get a serious culture chok if they sent their children to school here

    From 5th through 12th grade we have a mandatory class called "News and information about our society"

    Below is the official description

    "We work with what is happening in the world, learn something about what we see on TV, The Internet and hear about on the radio. Discuss a variety of sources and learn how to evaluate their information and what they are trying to tell us. We look at various laws, regulations and rules, look at what they mean for us, for society or for the world."

    Basically everything is allowed. If the young people want to discuss it - Race, Religion, Politics, Sexuality, War, Peace, Racisme, LGB, Environment, Global warming and yes - Even Trump lol. My brothers son who is 11 was talking about it the other day and. The kids had had a discussion about where the line was between legal and non-legal speach and someone brought him up. Kids today are really well informed and knows a whole lot more than a lot of adults suspects. They are taught how to find information and how to evaluate it and some of the discussions is VERY frank. Kids dont have the same filter as adults.
     
    Ok.
    What is view on "50 Shades of Grey"? Should that be in the 7th grade libraries as well?
    What do you think will happen to a kid in the seventh grade who takes that book out?
     
    Ok.
    What is view on "50 Shades of Grey"? Should that be in the 7th grade libraries as well?
    IMG_7067.jpeg
     
    has it ever been? you are just throwing out stuff you know no one has ever requested to be in a library, your comparisons are gettng dumber..
    Why would it not be allowed, why does one have to be in school libraries and one not?
     
    What do you think will happen to a kid in the seventh grade who takes that book out?
    Lets stick with the question. Do you think 50 Shades is appropriate for a 7th grader?
     
    Why would it not be allowed, why does one have to be in school libraries and one not?
    There's a limited number of TARDIS's in the universes, so most libraries don't have the luxury of infinite shelf space. That's why they have to limit the number of books they carry. Unless, are these books we're talking about digital or physical?

    If they're digital, then it's ridiculously tyrannical to ban any books, because the digital checkout system can easily give each and every parent individual and complete control over what digital books their children can and can not read.
     

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