What happens to the Republican Party now? (1 Viewer)

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    MT15

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    This election nonsense by Trump may end up splitting up the Republican Party. I just don’t see how the one third (?) who are principled conservatives can stay in the same party with Trump sycophants who are willing to sign onto the TX Supreme Court case.

    We also saw the alt right types chanting “destroy the GOP” in Washington today because they didn’t keep Trump in power. I think the Q types will also hold the same ill will toward the traditional Republican Party. In fact its quite possible that all the voters who are really in a Trump personality cult will also blame the GOP for his loss. It’s only a matter of time IMO before Trump himself gets around to blaming the GOP.

    There is some discussion of this on Twitter. What do you all think?



     
    TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas lawmakers are joining fellow Republicans in other states in trying to restrict diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives on university campuses, but they've drafted their proposals to avoid having to agree on how to define DEI.

    The Kansas House planned to vote Thursday on a bill aimed at preventing universities, community colleges or technical colleges from basing a student's admission or an employee's hiring or promotion on any statement or pledge about diversity, equity or inclusion. While the bill includes those words, it also says universities cannot require a statement about “any political ideology or movement.”

    The vote was set a week after the Senate approved a proposed $25 billion state budget with a provision designed to force universities to eliminate such requirements and mandatory DEI training. The provision would withhold $35.7 million from the state's six universities until they report to Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly and the Republican-controlled Legislature's leaders that they have done so.

    Republicans in at least 20 states have sought to limit DEI initiatives, arguing that they are discriminatory and enforce a liberal political orthodoxy. Alabama's governor signed into law an anti-DEI bill on Wednesday; Utah enacted a law earlier this year; and proposals in Kentucky and South Carolina advanced this week.............

     
    I know we've debated the 'vote your conscience' protest 3rd party voting here multiple times but I really like how she lays it out

    You've got 2 choices, and that's it

    Love her 'reality of your choices' bit. I'll have to remember that
     
    TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas lawmakers are joining fellow Republicans in other states in trying to restrict diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives on university campuses, but they've drafted their proposals to avoid having to agree on how to define DEI.

    The Kansas House planned to vote Thursday on a bill aimed at preventing universities, community colleges or technical colleges from basing a student's admission or an employee's hiring or promotion on any statement or pledge about diversity, equity or inclusion. While the bill includes those words, it also says universities cannot require a statement about “any political ideology or movement.”

    The vote was set a week after the Senate approved a proposed $25 billion state budget with a provision designed to force universities to eliminate such requirements and mandatory DEI training. The provision would withhold $35.7 million from the state's six universities until they report to Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly and the Republican-controlled Legislature's leaders that they have done so.

    Republicans in at least 20 states have sought to limit DEI initiatives, arguing that they are discriminatory and enforce a liberal political orthodoxy. Alabama's governor signed into law an anti-DEI bill on Wednesday; Utah enacted a law earlier this year; and proposals in Kentucky and South Carolina advanced this week.............

    man you would think segregation was over but nope republicans are bring it back but worse. but make it so ill defined that its hard to fight it.
     
    Lawmakers in mostly conservative states are pushing a coordinated effort to bring chaplains into public schools, aided by a new, legislation-crafting network that aims to address policy issues “from a biblical world view” and by a consortium whose promotional materials say chaplains are a way to convert millions to Christianity.


    The bills have been introduced this legislative season in 14 states, inspired by Texas, which passed a law last year allowing school districts to hire chaplains or use them as volunteers for whatever role the local school board sees fit, including replacing trained counselors.

    Chaplain bills were approved by one legislative chamber in three states — Utah, Indiana and Louisiana — but died in Utah and Indiana. Bills are pending in nine states. One passed both houses of Florida’s legislature and is awaiting the governor’s signature.


    The bills are mushrooming in an era when the U.S. Supreme Court has expanded the rights of religious people and groups in the public square and weakened historic protections meant to keep the government from endorsing religion.

    In a 2022 case, Justice Neil M. Gorsuch referred to the “so-called separation of church and state.” Former president Donald Trump has edged close to a government-sanctioned religion by asserting in his campaign that immigrants who “don’t like our religion — which a lot of them don’t” would be barred from the country in a second term.

    “We are reclaiming religious freedom in this country,” said Jason Rapert, a former Arkansas state senator and the president of the National Association of Christian Lawmakers, which he founded in 2019 to craft model legislation, according to the group’s site. Its mission is “to bring federal, state and local lawmakers together in support of clear biblical principles … to address major policy concerns from a biblical world view,” the site says……


     
    Lawmakers in mostly conservative states are pushing a coordinated effort to bring chaplains into public schools, aided by a new, legislation-crafting network that aims to address policy issues “from a biblical world view” and by a consortium whose promotional materials say chaplains are a way to convert millions to Christianity.
    great bring more child molesting into schools.
     
    A Tennessee manufacturer was fined nearly $300,000 for employing minors to operate dangerous equipment, the Labor Department announced Monday.

    Tuff Torq Corp., which makes outdoor power-equipment components for such brands as John Deere, Toro and Yamaha, also must set aside $1.5 million in profits for the 10 children it employed, according to a consent judgment entered in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Tennessee.

    “Our work will help prevent the next death or injury by ensuring Tuff Torq takes immediate and significant steps to stop the illegal employment of children,” said Jessica Looman, wage and hour division administrator at the Labor Department, in a statement.

    Neither Tuff Torq nor its parent company, Yanmar Co., responded to a request for comment.
    The $296,951 fine comes amid a wave of child labor violations across the country, with citations reaching levels not seen in nearly two decades.

    The federal government reported 5,792 minors working in violation of child labor laws in the year ending Sept. 30, 2023. The rising numbers are, in part, being driven by a historically tight labor market that’s led to shortages across several industries, as well as an immigration surge that has brought hundreds of thousands of unaccompanied minors into the United States.…..

     
    Republicans, on paper, appear to have a golden opportunity to win back the Senate majority.

    Down just 49-51, the party figures it will easily win the West Virginia seat left open by the retirement of Sen. Joe Manchin III.

    Moreover, Republicans are eyeing the seats of Democratic incumbents in red (Ohio, Montana) and purple (Pennsylvania, Nevada) states, plus open seats in Michigan and Arizona. (Former governor Larry Hogan is running for the open seat in Maryland, but that seat continues to be rated as “likely Democratic” by most forecasters.)

    If Democrats don’t run the table on those seats and hold the presidency (giving them a 50-50 split with Vice President Harris to break ties), they will lose the majority.


    But before Republicans start measuring the drapes in the majority leader’s office, they should take a hard look at their candidates.


    In Arizona, Republicans are bent on nominating MAGA maniac Kari Lake, who lost her gubernatorial bid in 2022.

    For their Ohio nominee, Republicans went with Bernie Moreno, the choice of four-times-indicted former president Donald Trump, who suggested his opponent was too sympathetic toward LGBTQ+ issues — and yet, according to an Associated Press report, Moreno had an account created under his email address in 2008 on a website for gay men seeking casual sex. (A former Moreno intern has said he created the account as a juvenile prank.)

    Republicans cleared the field in Pennsylvania for David McCormick, whose residency in Pennsylvania is in doubt — bringing back memories of Mehmet Oz, the New Jerseyan who never recovered in 2022 from gibes about his residence.

    By contrast, Democrats are running some of their savviest incumbents, each with a knack for ticket-splitting, such as Jon Tester in Montana, Sherrod Brown in Ohio and Tammy Baldwin in Wisconsin.

    Tester, you might recall, won by four points in 2012 despite President Barack Obama losing the state by almost 14 points. Likewise, Brown won in 2018 by about seven points while a Republican won for governor by four points and House Republicans won 12 of 16 seats with 75 percent of all votes cast in House races in Ohio.

    And in Wisconsin, Baldwin won in 2018 by 11 points, running about six points above the Democratic governor at the top of the ticket…..,

     
    Republicans, on paper, appear to have a golden opportunity to win back the Senate majority.

    Down just 49-51, the party figures it will easily win the West Virginia seat left open by the retirement of Sen. Joe Manchin III.

    Moreover, Republicans are eyeing the seats of Democratic incumbents in red (Ohio, Montana) and purple (Pennsylvania, Nevada) states, plus open seats in Michigan and Arizona. (Former governor Larry Hogan is running for the open seat in Maryland, but that seat continues to be rated as “likely Democratic” by most forecasters.)

    If Democrats don’t run the table on those seats and hold the presidency (giving them a 50-50 split with Vice President Harris to break ties), they will lose the majority.


    But before Republicans start measuring the drapes in the majority leader’s office, they should take a hard look at their candidates.


    In Arizona, Republicans are bent on nominating MAGA maniac Kari Lake, who lost her gubernatorial bid in 2022.

    For their Ohio nominee, Republicans went with Bernie Moreno, the choice of four-times-indicted former president Donald Trump, who suggested his opponent was too sympathetic toward LGBTQ+ issues — and yet, according to an Associated Press report, Moreno had an account created under his email address in 2008 on a website for gay men seeking casual sex. (A former Moreno intern has said he created the account as a juvenile prank.)

    Republicans cleared the field in Pennsylvania for David McCormick, whose residency in Pennsylvania is in doubt — bringing back memories of Mehmet Oz, the New Jerseyan who never recovered in 2022 from gibes about his residence.

    By contrast, Democrats are running some of their savviest incumbents, each with a knack for ticket-splitting, such as Jon Tester in Montana, Sherrod Brown in Ohio and Tammy Baldwin in Wisconsin.

    Tester, you might recall, won by four points in 2012 despite President Barack Obama losing the state by almost 14 points. Likewise, Brown won in 2018 by about seven points while a Republican won for governor by four points and House Republicans won 12 of 16 seats with 75 percent of all votes cast in House races in Ohio.

    And in Wisconsin, Baldwin won in 2018 by 11 points, running about six points above the Democratic governor at the top of the ticket…..,

    There is really something wrong/weak/incompetent with the Democratic party as a whole when the GOP trots out idiots, seditionists and scumbags and either wins outright or stays within a percentage point.
    How did the Dems get this stink attached to them and how do they get rid of it?
     
    That's all well and good, and I hope it keeps up. But a national election is miles different from a special election in Bama. It's definitely a good sign tho.

    It's an indications that there are a lot of voters that polls aren't accounting for. And it seems that a lot those voters are being motivated by abortion/IVF/contraception issues. Which would seem to indicate a lot of women voters that haven't traditionally voted.

    This has been happening since 2022 though, so it's a little surprising that pollsters haven't adequately accounted for this shift yet. Or maybe not that surprising given the polling troubles since 2016.
     

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