What happens to the Republican Party now? (4 Viewers)

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MT15

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This election nonsense by Trump may end up splitting up the Republican Party. I just don’t see how the one third (?) who are principled conservatives can stay in the same party with Trump sycophants who are willing to sign onto the TX Supreme Court case.

We also saw the alt right types chanting “destroy the GOP” in Washington today because they didn’t keep Trump in power. I think the Q types will also hold the same ill will toward the traditional Republican Party. In fact its quite possible that all the voters who are really in a Trump personality cult will also blame the GOP for his loss. It’s only a matter of time IMO before Trump himself gets around to blaming the GOP.

There is some discussion of this on Twitter. What do you all think?



 
So, it wasn’t because of Mayor Pete or DEI? Huh, what do you know?



F Larry Hogan, he also gutted the state of MD tax offices.....it took me almost 2 years to get them to correct their mistake and one of them told me that Hogan's administration refused to replace the many folks that retired.....this is a state with some of the highest taxes in the nation, so makes perfect sense, right?

He's a clown, just like the rest of the R's for the most part....
 
This could have gone in a number of threads
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Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee (R) signed a bill into law this week that nullified ordinances enacted by Memphis leaders following the 2023 police killing of Tyre Nichols, enabling the Republican-led legislature to undo the work of the Democratic-leaning city.

The law, passed by the legislature this month, prohibits local governments from enacting policies that limit police agencies’ activity when carrying out their lawful duties.

That will undo Memphis’s ordinance banning traffic stops for certain minor traffic violations, which was passed last year in response to the fatal beating of Nichols, a 29-year-old Black man, after police stopped him for an alleged traffic violation. It also nullifies ordinances requiring the monthly publication of data collected by officers during traffic stops and prohibiting unmarked police cars from being used for traffic stops, according to attorneys for Nichols’s parents.

His mother and stepfather, RowVaughn and Rodney Wells, had asked Lee not to sign the bill into law. Their legal team, led by attorneys Ben Crump and Antonio Romanucci, responded Saturday to Lee’s bill signing with a one-word quote: “SHAME.”

The bill not only nullifies the Memphis measures but also erases the political power of the local community members who fought for them, activists and Democratic policymakers said.

“We are disappointed that the State has overridden local ordinances overwhelmingly approved by the Memphis City Council,” Memphis Mayor Paul Young (D) said in a statement to The Washington Post on Saturday. “We believe that it is important for cities and municipalities to be able to define the rules that govern them.”

He said the city’s legal team was reviewing the legislation to determine how to modify its policies to operate within the law.............



 
More fun from Tennessee

Could have gone in the racist thread also
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Republican lawmakers in Tennessee this week replaced the board of trustees at the state’s only public historically Black college, saying leaders had mismanaged money at the school despite being underfunded for years.

Gov. Bill Lee (R) signed into law Thursday a bill to vacate the 10-member board at Tennessee State University shortly after the measure was approved in a 66-25 vote by the GOP-controlled state House. The measure took effect immediately, and Lee also named new trustees for the board of the HBCU in Nashville.

Some lawmakers expressed concerns that state leaders, who are predominantly White, are unfairly singling out Tennessee State.

“I’ve seen many audits of many universities that look horrendous,” state Rep. Bo Mitchell (D-Nashville) said after the House vote. “Have we ever, ever vacated an entire board of a university before? Have we ever done that?”

In a statement, Tennessee State officials said, “We believe this legislation will disrupt our students’ educational pursuits, harm the image of the University, and remove a Board that had achieved success in its enhanced governance of TSU.” The statement also said the school never mismanaged funds.

Several audits conducted over the years, including two released this week, revealed that TSU has face challenges in maintaining financial stability, which led lawmakers to pursuedissolving the board of trustees.

But a recent forensic audit revealed no evidence of “fraud or malfeasance” at the university.

But a recent report from the state comptroller’s office indicated that the school is not meeting federal guidelines for various programs, including the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund during the pandemic, Pell Grants, and said the school granted Title IV funds to ineligible students.

Tennessee State officials stated that proper funding could have changed their situation. The state’s legislature previously determined that — at $544 million — the university was underfunded.

A federal report last fall on land-grant universities like Tennessee State stated the university has been underfunded by the state by $2.1 billion between 1987 to 2022. Just two schools in the state have the land-grant designation: TSU and the University of Tennessee……..

State Rep. Justin Pearson (D-Memphis) told Nashville’s local NPR station, WPLN, “The University of Tennessee — a predominantly white institution and the state’s other land grant university — did, in fact, get its full state funding each year.”

“Some years, the University of Tennessee even got more than its required funding levels,” Pearson said. “But Tennessee State University was denied those resources, and because they were denied the resources, there were problems that occurred.”………


 
The murder of six people at a church school in an affluent, largely white enclave of Tennessee’s largest city one year ago sparked a mass protest movement for gun control by Nashville parents.

The Republican-dominated legislature met that movement with some spending on school police officers as a gesture to the outrage, a law shielding gun and ammunition manufacturers from liability as a gesture to Tennessee’s powerful gun lobby and the expulsion of the two Black lawmakers as a gesture of warning to people causing too much trouble.

Other antidemocratic displays over the last year would be just as outrageous, if people outside of Tennessee were still paying attention.

The temporary expulsion of Representatives Justin Pearson and Justin Jones was only the first cautionary tale in a saga of retribution that has continued apace, activists say.

Conservative domination – maintained by gerrymandered districts, disenfranchised voters and an increasing sense of political despair – insulates Tennessee Republicans from political consequences for unpopular decisions.

Challenged in public by increasing activism on the left and apocalyptic rhetoric on the right, Tennessee Republicans stopped just chipping away at democratic norms and began hammering full-on like coalminers on Rocky Top.

Republicans rode the Tea Party wave of 2010 into a dominant position in Tennessee. Bit by bit over the last 14 years, they have turned Tennessee into a one-party state.

About 37% of Tennesseans vote for Democrats in national elections, but Republicans hold a 75-24 supermajority in the Tennessee house and a 27-6 supermajority in the state senate – enough to override a veto and propose constitutional changes.

Tennessee fails Princeton’s report card on gerrymandering. Only seven state house seats are considered competitive. No state senate seats are competitive.

The last Democrat to win a statewide office in Tennessee was Governor Phil Bredesen, who left office in January 2011. All five state supreme court justices are Republican appointees……
In a conversation leaked to the Tennessee Holler of a Tennessee Republican house caucus meeting recorded after the vote to expel the Tennessee Three last year, Republicans framed their opposition in apocalyptic terms.
“Everyone should recognize that the Democrats are not our friends,” said Representative Jason Zachary. “They destroy the republic and the foundation of who we are, or we preserve it. That is the reality of where we are right now, and if these last three days have not proven that, you need to find a new job.”


Other Republicans shared similar sentiments.

“I think the problem I have is if we don’t stick together, if you don’t believe we’re at war for our republic, with all love and respect to you, you need a different job,” said Representative Scott Cepicky in the leaked video. “The left wants Tennessee so bad, because if they get us, the south-east falls, and it’s game over for the republic.”………
 
Agree with this. It’s also a sign of desperation.

 
Tim Sheehy, a charismatic former Navy SEAL who is the Republican candidate in a U.S. Senate race in Montana that could determine control of the chamber, has cited a gunshot wound he received in combat that he said left a bullet in his right arm as evidence of his toughness.


“I got thick skin — though it’s not thick enough. I have a bullet stuck in this arm still from Afghanistan,” Sheehy said in a video of a December campaign event posted on social media, pointing to his right forearm.


It was one of several inconsistent accounts Sheehy has shared about being shot while deployed. And in October 2015, more than a year after he left active duty, he told a different story.


After a family visit to Montana’s Glacier National Park, he told a National Park Service ranger that he accidentally shot himself in the right arm that day when his Colt .45 revolver fell and discharged while he was loading his vehicle in the park, according to a record of the episode filed in U.S. District Court for the District of Montana.

The self-inflicted gunshot left a bullet lodged in Sheehy’s right forearm, according to the written description accompanying the federal citation that the ranger, a federal law enforcement officer, gave Sheehy for illegally discharging his weapon in a national park. The citation said the description was based on Sheehy’s telling of events.


Asked this week about the citation, which has not been previously reported, Sheehy told The Washington Post that the statement he gave the ranger was a lie.

He said he made up the story about the gun going off to protect himself and his former platoonmates from facing a potential military investigation into an old bullet wound that he said he got in Afghanistan in 2012.

He said he did not know for certain whether the wound was the result of friendly fire or from enemy ammunition, and said he never reported the incident to his superiors.


Sheehy said he did not shoot himself in the park in 2015, but rather fell and hurt himself on a hike, necessitating a trip to an emergency room, where he said he told hospital staff he had a bullet in his arm, triggering his interview with the ranger…….

 
Tim Sheehy, a charismatic former Navy SEAL who is the Republican candidate in a U.S. Senate race in Montana that could determine control of the chamber, has cited a gunshot wound he received in combat that he said left a bullet in his right arm as evidence of his toughness.


“I got thick skin — though it’s not thick enough. I have a bullet stuck in this arm still from Afghanistan,” Sheehy said in a video of a December campaign event posted on social media, pointing to his right forearm.


It was one of several inconsistent accounts Sheehy has shared about being shot while deployed. And in October 2015, more than a year after he left active duty, he told a different story.


After a family visit to Montana’s Glacier National Park, he told a National Park Service ranger that he accidentally shot himself in the right arm that day when his Colt .45 revolver fell and discharged while he was loading his vehicle in the park, according to a record of the episode filed in U.S. District Court for the District of Montana.

The self-inflicted gunshot left a bullet lodged in Sheehy’s right forearm, according to the written description accompanying the federal citation that the ranger, a federal law enforcement officer, gave Sheehy for illegally discharging his weapon in a national park. The citation said the description was based on Sheehy’s telling of events.


Asked this week about the citation, which has not been previously reported, Sheehy told The Washington Post that the statement he gave the ranger was a lie.

He said he made up the story about the gun going off to protect himself and his former platoonmates from facing a potential military investigation into an old bullet wound that he said he got in Afghanistan in 2012.

He said he did not know for certain whether the wound was the result of friendly fire or from enemy ammunition, and said he never reported the incident to his superiors.


Sheehy said he did not shoot himself in the park in 2015, but rather fell and hurt himself on a hike, necessitating a trip to an emergency room, where he said he told hospital staff he had a bullet in his arm, triggering his interview with the ranger…….

Cue the Santos backstory in 3, 2, 1.
 
During the first impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump in 2019, former Trump national security aide Fiona Hill made an extraordinary plea.

Seated in front of congressional Republicans, she implored them not to spread Russian propaganda.
“In the course of this investigation, I would ask that you please not promote politically driven falsehoods that so clearly advance Russian interests,” she told them.

She was referring to comments they had made during her earlier deposition breathing life into a baseless, Trump-backed suggestion that Ukraine, rather than Russia, interfered in the 2016 U.S. election.


“These fictions are harmful even if they’re deployed for purely domestic political purposes,” she added.
Republicans on the committee blanched at the suggestion that they had served as conduits for Russian misinformation, but Hill refused to back down.

Five years later, Republicans are starting to grapple more publicly with the idea that this kind of thing is happening in their ranks.

The most striking example came this week. In an interview with Puck News’s Julia Ioffe, Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Tex.) — none other than the GOP chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee — flat-out said that Russian propaganda had “infected a good chunk of my party’s base.”

McCaul suggested conservative media was to blame.
“There are some more nighttime entertainment shows that seem to spin, like, I see the Russian propaganda in some of it — and it’s almost identical [to what they’re saying on Russian state television] — on our airwaves,” McCaul said.


He also cited “these people that read various conspiracy-theory outlets that are just not accurate, and they actually model Russian propaganda.”


Asked which Republicans specifically he was talking about, McCaul said it was “obvious,” before staff intervened and asked that the conversation go off the record…….

 

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