What happens to the Republican Party now? (1 Viewer)

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    MT15

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    This election nonsense by Trump may end up splitting up the Republican Party. I just don’t see how the one third (?) who are principled conservatives can stay in the same party with Trump sycophants who are willing to sign onto the TX Supreme Court case.

    We also saw the alt right types chanting “destroy the GOP” in Washington today because they didn’t keep Trump in power. I think the Q types will also hold the same ill will toward the traditional Republican Party. In fact its quite possible that all the voters who are really in a Trump personality cult will also blame the GOP for his loss. It’s only a matter of time IMO before Trump himself gets around to blaming the GOP.

    There is some discussion of this on Twitter. What do you all think?



     
    lol - both pictures below are AI. On the left, the American flag has a six-pointed star, the guy’s shirt has writing that isn’t real, and then on the right there’s the third arm. They couldn’t find any black Rs?

     
    This will be commonplace if Rs are not defeated at the polls.

     
    lol - both pictures below are AI. On the left, the American flag has a six-pointed star, the guy’s shirt has writing that isn’t real, and then on the right there’s the third arm. They couldn’t find any black Rs?



    Getting people who don't exist to vote for them? That is absolutely correct.
     

    I think people get it backwards regarding campaign spending. I don't think people who spend the most money usually win, because they spent the most money. I think the people who spend the most money usually win, because they have more money to spend because they have more people willing to give them money, especially small donors.

    I don't think RNC raised less money because of Ronna, I think they raised less money, because they're are less people willing to give them money.
     
    I think people get it backwards regarding campaign spending. I don't think people who spend the most money usually win, because they spent the most money. I think the people who spend the most money usually win, because they have more money to spend because they have more people willing to give them money, especially small donors.

    I don't think RNC raised less money because of Ronna, I think they raised less money, because they're are less people willing to give them money.
    Also because they've been giving to straight to Trump and his PAC's instead.
     
    Also because they've been giving to straight to Trump and his PAC's instead.
    Winner, this. Trump doesn’t like to share, at all, with anyone for any reason. I think LA’s reason is also a part of it as well, but the overall effect of Trump is selfishness and greed. He doesn’t care if the R Party succeeds or fails, all he sees are his own issues and whoever will show blind loyalty to him.
     
    The Republican majority in the House of Representatives is still plugging away at its impeachment inquiry aimed at President Biden. So far, it has provided scant evidence that Mr. Biden committed “high crimes and misdemeanors.”

    Blatantly partisan as that endeavor is, it’s not the only misuse of Congress’s impeachment power going on at the moment. The other such effort targets Alejandro Mayorkas, the secretary of homeland security. If anything, this is the bigger embarrassment to the House.


    There is a real crisis along the southern border, and it has happened on Mr. Mayorkas’s watch: More than 2.3 million migrants have come across and have been released into the country, usually pending asylum applications, since Mr. Biden took office. Both the secretary and the president deserve to be held appropriately accountable for whatever has gone wrong.


    But the two articles of impeachment against Mr. Mayorkas, which the Homeland Security Committee approved — on a party-line vote — early Wednesday, are about political scapegoating, not genuine accountability. One charges the secretary with “refusal to comply with the law”; another with “breach of public trust.”

    This vague, over-the-top document claims that the career public servant “will remain a threat to national security and border security, the safety of the American people, and to the Constitution if allowed to remain in office.”

    To the extent it’s factual at all, the GOP case against Mr. Mayorkas is that he falsely told the House Judiciary Committee during a 2022 hearing that his department had “operational control” over the border.

    In subsequent testimony, Mr. Mayorkas noted that the Border Patrol defines operational control as “the ability to detect, respond and interdict border penetrations in areas deemed as high priority.”

    Republicans cite the 2006 Secure Fence Act, claiming, spuriously, that operational control requires zero illegal border crossings by contraband or people, an impossible standard.

    University of Missouri law professor Frank Bowman testified to the Homeland Security Committee on Jan. 10 that the Founders saw impeachment as a “last resort” for penalizing “official misconduct, which is extraordinarily serious in degree and, critically, of a type that corrupts or subverts governmental processes of the constitutional order itself.”

    Hence the Constitution reserves impeachment for “treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.”

    The accusations against Mr. Mayorkas amount to a claim that he’s done a bad job, essentially the subjective charge of “maladministration” that James Madison expressly rejected as a basis for impeachment — because it would be inevitably partisan…….


     
    Since this thread is called: "What happens to the Republican Party Now?"
    I thought this current story fits very well....
    *
     
    Since this thread is called: "What happens to the Republican Party Now?"
    I thought this current story fits very well....
    *

    Defeating Biden with who?

    That's the RNC problem.
     
    The Republican majority in the House of Representatives is still plugging away at its impeachment inquiry aimed at President Biden. So far, it has provided scant evidence that Mr. Biden committed “high crimes and misdemeanors.”

    The Biden campaign needs to capitalize on this. A message along the lines of:

    "For over a year, the republicans in the house have spent the overwhelming majority of their time investigating every bit of my life, to include talking to friends of my family. During that time, they have been told over and over again that I took great pains to ensure that I did not cross any ethical, moral, or legal lines when it comes to the business endeavors of my family. It is the job of every voter in the United States to take their time vetting the candidates that are running for office to determine who is the best choice. The republicans have done that job, in vetting me for you, and have proven that I am a trustworthy candidate. The DOJ has done that job, in vetting my opponent, for you, and have amassed a wealth of evidence showing just what kind of candidate he is, and that evidence has led to 91 indictments. When you go to cast your vote this year, remember those things."
     
    SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon Supreme Court said Thursday that 10 Republican state senators who staged a record-long walkout last year to stall bills on abortion, transgender health care and gun rights cannot run for reelection.

    The decision upholds the secretary of state’s decision to disqualify the senators from the ballot under a voter-approved measure aimed at stopping such boycotts. Measure 113, passed by voters in 2022, amended the state constitution to bar lawmakers from reelection if they have more than 10 unexcused absences.

    Last year’s boycott lasted six weeks — the longest in state history — and paralyzed the legislative session, stalling hundreds of bills.

    Five lawmakers sued over the secretary of state’s decision — Sens. Tim Knopp, Daniel Bonham, Suzanne Weber, Dennis Linthicum and Lynn Findley. They were among the 10 GOP senators who racked up more than 10 absences.

    During oral arguments before the Oregon Supreme Court in December, attorneys for the senators and the state wrestled over the grammar and syntax of the language that was added to the state constitution after Measure 113 was approved by voters.……..



    thats great... all of a sudden it isn't fair to the type of people who tell everyone else life isn't fair..lol
     

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