Now is not the time to talk about gun control (1 Viewer)

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DaveXA

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How would you obtain enough fissile material to test the law?
How would you protect yourself and others from the hazardous material of the weapon, lest you commit a crime by killing an innocent with the radiation?
Can your intended weapon be used for personal defense?
Ultimately, it's not even worth the trouble when a child killer 15 is so easily obtained.

But if you want a claymore mine to protect your property (not with a trip wire!), that's a Class 3 NFA item. You'll need to pay a $200 tax stamp and go through a lot of paperwork.
Want a rocket for your rocket launcher? That's a Class 3 NFA item. You'll need to pay a $200 tax stamp and go through a lot of paperwork.

Lol, I want a flame thrower, but I guess I can settle for a howitzer. :yes:
 

DaveXA

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Flame throwers aren't NFA items ... you can just buy one


I thought there were certain ones you have to have permits for? Maybe the old ones that shoot napalm or something? Or maybe you have to be certified to work on them. I remember watching some military show where the guy had to find someone who knew how to work on them. It's been a minute since I saw it, so I don't remember all the details.
 

Denzien

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I thought there were certain ones you have to have permits for? Maybe the old ones that shoot napalm or something? Or maybe you have to be certified to work on them. I remember watching some military show where the guy had to find someone who knew how to work on them. It's been a minute since I saw it, so I don't remember all the details.

There may be local ordinances or something, but nothing federal as far as I can tell



Used in agriculture:

 

JRad

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There may be local ordinances or something, but nothing federal as far as I can tell



Used in agriculture:

Forget the mortar, I want a flame tank* now


*ok, thresher
 

samiam5211

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How would you obtain enough fissile material to test the law?
How would you protect yourself and others from the hazardous material of the weapon, lest you commit a crime by killing an innocent with the radiation?
Can your intended weapon be used for personal defense?
Ultimately, it's not even worth the trouble when a child killer 15 is so easily obtained.

But if you want a claymore mine to protect your property (not with a trip wire!), that's a Class 3 NFA item. You'll need to pay a $200 tax stamp and go through a lot of paperwork.
Want a rocket for your rocket launcher? That's a Class 3 NFA item. You'll need to pay a $200 tax stamp and go through a lot of paperwork.
Elon Musk could build a nuke if he wanted to.

What if he decided he wanted to?
 

Denzien

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I don't know, man. After the SEALs pull off that synchronized sniping of those pirates on the open ocean, I believe they can take out anyone.
That was really something else, wasn't it?

 

Denzien

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By this argument we should get rid of all laws, don’t you think?

No, I don't think that's the case. Laws exist to define and punish people for committing crimes; real crimes require a victim. Otherwise, you're writing laws based on the perception of some future crime, or you're calling society a "victim" in an attempt to justify criminalizing what might be benign behaviors (speeding in Texas, for example, is considered a criminal offense. Speeding 10 over in a 50 on a wide, deserted road carries with it risk to whom?). In the most onerous cases, laws are written in an attempt to influence how society runs rather than letting society define itself. Many of our problems today are caused by a government solution to some completely different problem.

So, hypothetically, if Elon Musk builds a nuclear weapon in secret, stores it safely and never uses it, what actual crime has been committed?
I recognize the obvious counter point that if Musk uses this weapon to hurt others (a future crime), he will have committed a real crime - then people will complain that this should have been illegal so that it never happens again. I understand this perspective.

A less strawman-like topic would be: If I was to keep a loaded pistol in my house in a hidden but insecure place, have I committed a crime simply because someone might find and use the weapon in an unlawful manner?
 

MT15

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My point was that one reason laws exist is to punish after the fact, as you stated. So saying it shouldn’t be illegal to own a nuclear weapon because there wouldn’t be a way to stop someone from building one in advance sort of negates one purpose of every law on the books.

Using your new example, drunk driving wouldn’t be illegal unless or until someone gets hurt or killed or property gets damaged. Because unless an accident occurs, theres really no problem, right? Which illustrates the second reason for laws, which is to deter someone from doing something dangerous to themselves or others.

So should we wipe drunk driving laws off the books? Would that have a negative effect on society in your opinion?
 

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