California to Ban Sales of New Gas-Powered Cars Starting in 2035 (1 Viewer)

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NoPartyMike

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https://www.npr.org/2020/09/23/9162...er-banning-sales-of-new-gasoline-cars-by-2035

Gov Newsome says the changes are being implemented to fight climate change.

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/26/8836...electric-truck-rule-targets-diesel-death-zone

In similar news, back in June, the CA Air Resources Board passed a mandate that by 2045 all new diesel truck sales, targeting the 18 wheeler industry, will need to be electric.


In Newsome's press conference he says they have a strong plan, the auto industry is trending this way, and they want to motivate society to make the switch to electric faster.

I think this is a noble venture, and amplified if the materials and power can also be produced in a more climate friendly manner than that of fossil fuels.
 
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Mr. Blue Sky

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https://www.npr.org/2020/09/23/9162...er-banning-sales-of-new-gasoline-cars-by-2035

Gov Newsome says the changes are being implemented to fight climate change.

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/26/8836...electric-truck-rule-targets-diesel-death-zone

In similar news, back in June, the CA Air Resources Board passed a mandate that by 2045 all new diesel truck sales, targeting the 18 wheeler industry, will need to be electric.


In Newsome's press conference he says they have a strong plan, the auto industry is trending this way, and they want to motivate society to make the switch to electric faster.

I think this is a noble venture, with consideration that the materials and power can also be produced in a more climate friendly manner than that of fossil fuels.



Not aggressive enough.. Shoulda happened years ago.. Also, will force automakers to pour more resources into developing electric cars, which has already been happening anyway.

Maybe now e-cars will be better designed and more affordable for the masses.. BTW , it’s only a matter of time til this becomes the law of the land; almost all of this stuff starts in California, then spreads to the rest of the country.. People talk **** about CA, but they are always ahead of the curve.
 

SaulGoodmanEsq

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Other than the obvious graft from the fossil fuel industry, I've never understood conservative's opposition to renewable energy. Isn't the ability to be self-sufficient from an energy perspective part of an 'America First' world view? If you can produce energy through wind-turbines or electric powered cars then so much the better as the country is less dependent on foreign oil. Of course Trump rants about how windmills ruin the views on his golf courses...
 

wardorican

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Other than the obvious graft from the fossil fuel industry, I've never understood conservative's opposition to renewable energy. Isn't the ability to be self-sufficient from an energy perspective part of an 'America First' world view? If you can produce energy through wind-turbines or electric powered cars then so much the better as the country is less dependent on foreign oil. Of course Trump rants about how windmills ruin the views on his golf courses...
Forcing people to buy new. Range and refuel limitations.
 

The moose

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I know it sounds good but most people keep cars for staggering amounts of time.

If you just use me as an example. I don't buy new just once in my whole life. I buy 6 to 10 years old and keep for usually another 10. I could buy new but I would much rather write a check and not finance.

It is gonna take a long time to get the gas powered cars off the road you could easily add twenty year to what the date they set.

Yes they can make it more expensive to keep stuff on the road but that will only hurt the poor. They need to make it affordable to go electric and I am not talking about the musk lies. The type 3 was supposed to be 35k but they are all much more expensive usually closer to 50k.

All your housing will need charging stations. That will then effect the poor because apartments will go up. It is gonna take investment from all kinds of people to make it work not just dealers.

But yes I do think it needs to happen just like we need to stop buying all the huge SUVs and trucks.
 

LA - L.A.

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I know it sounds good but most people keep cars for staggering amounts of time.

If you just use me as an example. I don't buy new just once in my whole life. I buy 6 to 10 years old and keep for usually another 10. I could buy new but I would much rather write a check and not finance.

It is gonna take a long time to get the gas powered cars off the road you could easily add twenty year to what the date they set.

Yes they can make it more expensive to keep stuff on the road but that will only hurt the poor. They need to make it affordable to go electric and I am not talking about the musk lies. The type 3 was supposed to be 35k but they are all much more expensive usually closer to 50k.

All your housing will need charging stations. That will then effect the poor because apartments will go up. It is gonna take investment from all kinds of people to make it work not just dealers.

But yes I do think it needs to happen just like we need to stop buying all the huge SUVs and trucks.
There's an ample supply of used electric cars on the market in California.

The state also has several incentive programs to help offset the costs of charging stations in homes and apartment buildings. There is a concerted effort to not only reduce fossil fuel vehicles, but to reduce the dependency on vehicles.
 

wardorican

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I think it's a worthy goal, but there may have to be some limitations.

I also see the big thing coming for commercial airliners is hydrogen fuel cell turbines.
 

The moose

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There's an ample supply of used electric cars on the market in California.

The state also has several incentive programs to help offset the costs of charging stations in homes and apartment buildings. There is a concerted effort to not only reduce fossil fuel vehicles, but to reduce the dependency on vehicles.
I don't know the last time I looked into in california was still selling less than six percent of the new cars that are electric or a electric hybrid.

But yes california has by far the most used electric cars on the used market. Hell some manufacturers only sell the electric cars they offer in that state. That is still a tiny fraction of the vehicles sold.

The real answer is not totally electric but a hybrid that has a tiny engine driving a generator to charge when you can't plug in. Would fix range problems and when you can plug in that engine would not have to start.

You could then run that off of natural gas or something exceptionally cleaner than gas.

But that is just too God damned logical.
 

LA - L.A.

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I don't know the last time I looked into in california was still selling less than six percent of the new cars that are electric or a electric hybrid.

But yes california has by far the most used electric cars on the used market. Hell some manufacturers only sell the electric cars they offer in that state. That is still a tiny fraction of the vehicles sold.

The real answer is not totally electric but a hybrid that has a tiny engine driving a generator to charge when you can't plug in. Would fix range problems and when you can plug in that engine would not have to start.

You could then run that off of natural gas or something exceptionally cleaner than gas.

But that is just too God damned logical.
The Chevy Volt is one of those, it's been around for over 8 years and is quickly becoming obsolete technology There are also plenty of those available used if someone wants one.

Battery technology and storage ability keeps improving every year. In 15 years, battery driving range will make the need for a fossil fuel generator unnecessary.

California has been on this path for around 20 years. The only thing that has stymied our progress are the auto manufacturers, fossil fuel industry and the federal government.

Here's a documentary about some of that https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Killed_the_Electric_Car?
 
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Dragon

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There are many ways to support the move to Electric vehicles

Some of the ways it is done in Europe (not all in one country)

- Special permit to drive in inner-city "protected zones"
- Free inner city parking spaces with free charging stations
- Lower or no road taxes
- prefered access to customers (Taxi services) if the vehicle is electric they get automatic access to the premium pickup sites
- Fast-charging stations at rest-stops along the highways
- Reduced taxation when purchasing
 
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NoPartyMike

NoPartyMike

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I agree with those echoing the value of the hybrid technology. It removes the enormous burden and time sink of developing an electric charging infrastructure, and the technology is tried and true. Toyota's had great success with the Prius.
 

superchuck500

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I know it sounds good but most people keep cars for staggering amounts of time.

If you just use me as an example. I don't buy new just once in my whole life. I buy 6 to 10 years old and keep for usually another 10. I could buy new but I would much rather write a check and not finance.

It is gonna take a long time to get the gas powered cars off the road you could easily add twenty year to what the date they set.

Yes they can make it more expensive to keep stuff on the road but that will only hurt the poor. They need to make it affordable to go electric and I am not talking about the musk lies. The type 3 was supposed to be 35k but they are all much more expensive usually closer to 50k.

All your housing will need charging stations. That will then effect the poor because apartments will go up. It is gonna take investment from all kinds of people to make it work not just dealers.

But yes I do think it needs to happen just like we need to stop buying all the huge SUVs and trucks.
I don't disagree with any of that, but I think when you consider that the effective date on this plan is 15 years from now, I think it accommodates most of those interests.

The technology is evolving rapidly, especially now that the markets have been demonstrated and are growing. Each new year brings 10s of new EV models to the market. And as the technology and scale continue to drive costs down, I think the entry cost will start to come down too. The long-term operating and maintenance costs are substantially lower, at least through 80% life of the original batteries, which is already at 6+ years and likely quite a bit longer than that (with performance continuing to improve as the technology and scale continue to ramp up).
 
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Mr. Blue Sky

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I know it sounds good but most people keep cars for staggering amounts of time.

If you just use me as an example. I don't buy new just once in my whole life. I buy 6 to 10 years old and keep for usually another 10. I could buy new but I would much rather write a check and not finance.


I’m similar to you in that i like to buy cars that are a few years old and keep them for a while.. Which, to me, is why i dont find this new law to be aggressive or cost-prohibitive at all- it isnt like CA is saying that every driver needs to purchase a hybrid or EV by 2035; quite the contrary, i thinK that people , in CA and elsewhere, will be buying used non hybrid/EV vehicles to at least 2050 and beyond.. So this doesn’t really affect the majority of the population IMO.. and for me personally, i love the IDEA of driivng a hybrid/EV, but will only do so after the design & range improves, and even then only after there is a wide variety of hybrid/EV’s on the used car market.. So for all intents and purposes, I’ll probably be post 60 years old by the time EVs/hybrids meet my criteria to by one.
 

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I agree with those echoing the value of the hybrid technology. It removes the enormous burden and time sink of developing an electric charging infrastructure, and the technology is tried and true. Toyota's had great success with the Prius.
Yes, If I need to evacuate for a hurricane and get stuck in thick traffic, I'd rather have a hybrid or gas car, than an all electric.

Otherwise, I'm mostly fine with EV's. I just really like hybrids too. Even though I currently do not own one.
 

zztop

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I think by the time 2035 is here, electric vehicles will be far advanced compared to today. Also price of entry so to speak, will be a lot lower. I suspect there won't be many hybrids either, just straight electric. Most vehicle companies will have all switched their models over to electric/battery by then. I view a hybrid as a bridge between technologies. I can see maybe a few, like huge SUVs or big trucks still being hybrid, but I think by 2035 being able to go 300 miles on a single charge would probably be baseline for even the lowest model electric. However, all of this only applies to new vehicles b/c in 2035 there will still be a lot of used vehicles out there, so gasoline vehicle won't be off the roads for a lot longer (maybe closer to 2050)

I think this is the direction vehicle companies are headed. I often wondered why hydrogen didn't take off. But I read an article that stated it was only 60% as efficient. Whether this is due to lagging technology, b/c not as much money invested in refinements and development vs electric.. it is still kind of like a chicken/egg situation. California for example, only has (I think) 50 hydrogen stations in the entire state. while electric recharge stations are not as numerous as gasoline, there is still vastly more throughout the US vs hydrogen. I know Tesla is given a bad rap by some, but I do feel like without them, electric would not have expanded so fast in the US. Other companies are scrambling to keep up with innovations from Tesla, which in turn spurred more charging stations built etc.
You don't see the same thing happening with hydrogen
 
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Maxp

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The price of entry should be very accessible in less than 5 years. Volkswagen is releasing their Model 3 competition this year. Tesla revealed plans for a 25k car recently. Competition is forcing car makers to adjust. 500 miles ranges for the model 3 and Y are less than 5 years away too.
 

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I have a VW e-Golf and a hybrid Highlander.
I couldn’t buy a Tesla even though I really like them because Elon Musk is a butt. I might have to cave when I trade in my Highlander on a full sized EV because that thing is badass with the butterfly doors.

I use the electric car around the city for everyday use and the Highlander for getaways or longer work trips. I notice more and more EV stations popping up and the turbocharging (480v) can charge my car in like 25-35 minutes. If you have to use a pay one, to charge a car out it is like $5 to fully charge. Portland Electric has put in free ones all over the city too. I have the regular 110v that I use at my house as I didn’t see the need to buy the 220v. I might though as it can fully charge the car in like 8 hours vs 24 for the drip charge. I really never worry as I just plug it in when I am at home and it stays mostly charged.

I had a Jetta and the highlander before and i used to spend about $300 a month in gas in both cars. I spend about $30 now as I fill up the Highlander once a month about. Between that and the tax credit I got for buying the EV I save the the equivalent of the monthly payment in the new EV.
 

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