All things Racist...USA edition (3 Viewers)

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    Farb

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    I was looking for a place to put this so we could discuss but didn't really find a place that worked so I created this thread so we can all place articles, experiences, videos and examples of racism in the USA.

    This is one that happened this week. The lady even called and filed a complaint on the officer. This officer also chose to wear the body cam (apparently, LA doesn't require this yet). This exchange wasn't necessarily racist IMO until she started with the "mexican racist...you will never be white, like you want" garbage. That is when it turned racist IMO

    All the murderer and other insults, I think are just a by product of CRT and ACAB rhetoric that is very common on the radical left and sadly is being brought to mainstream in this country.

    Another point that I think is worth mentioning is she is a teacher and the sense of entitlement she feels is mind blowing.

    https://news.yahoo.com/black-teacher-berates-latino-la-221235341.html
     
    From the article:















    These stories are absolutely heartbreaking.

    One of the arguments against reparations for slavery is that it was soooo long ago.

    These schools aren't ancient history. This was going on when people were dancing to the Beatles and James Brown. I think they lasted even longer than that in Canada

    I'm curious what the 'it was soooo long ago' people against slavery reparations would say for the Native Americans who endured this. Something tells me that they'd still be against it

    None of this will ever be taught in school. I just found out these places existed a few years ago, and even then it was the whitewashed version, nothing about what really went on there

    In this thread and others on EE over the years whenever stories of racist horrors past and present were posted someone (we all know who) would chime in "Hey, blacks/asians/hispanics can be racist too!"

    If the people in the above stories said they hated white people to the core of their being, are they being racist? If so, are they being racist in the same way the people who did these things to them were racist to them?

    This all makes me so furious

    But hey, as some have said, they didn't die so it's all good
    better than the alternative of being killed right? plus they learned some skills.. smh...
     
    better than the alternative of being killed right? plus they learned some skills.. smh...
    The first articles I read on these schools said almost exactly this, and was eerily similar to Florida’s new guidelines

    Basically it was “the children were taken from their homes and that was wrong but they were given an education and learned skills so they could live a much better life than if they stayed on their reservations with their families”
     
    Last edited:
    The first articles I read on these schools said almost exactly this, and was eerily similar to Florida’s new guidelines

    Basically it was “the children were taken from their homes and that was wrong but they were given an education and learned skills so they could live a much better life than if they stayed on their reservations”
    Makes me so mad. Tell the people who wrote it that they have to be removed from their parents and home for their childhood; they wouldn’t make that trade.
     
    the 'do it the way we've always done it' model doesn't make me feel safe in society.
    Would you be on board with teaching them skills they could use when they get out, or are you against that because of tax dollars paying for it?
    my tax dollars are going toward them living, so what do I care if they learn something that might help them if they get out and don't repeat?

    There are some criminals that don't deserve even the courtesy thought of rehabilitation. Pedophiles and rapist come to mind. If we are talking a petty criminal, that might be possible although the stats don't show rehabilitation works at all in the prison system. I know what we are doing now is not working and what we are doing now is letting criminals out and hoping and praying the criminally insane take their meds and don't kill an innocent person on their way to work.
     
    my tax dollars are going toward them living, so what do I care if they learn something that might help them if they get out and don't repeat?

    There are some criminals that don't deserve even the courtesy thought of rehabilitation. Pedophiles and rapist come to mind. If we are talking a petty criminal, that might be possible although the stats don't show rehabilitation works at all in the prison system. I know what we are doing now is not working and what we are doing now is letting criminals out and hoping and praying the criminally insane take their meds and don't kill an innocent person on their way to work.
    Do you have any figures to prove we have changed our prison system in any way recently? You keep saying we are letting out criminals now, like something has fundamentally changed, and I am skeptical that is true.
     
    From the article:















    These stories are absolutely heartbreaking.

    One of the arguments against reparations for slavery is that it was soooo long ago.

    These schools aren't ancient history. This was going on when people were dancing to the Beatles and James Brown. I think they lasted even longer than that in Canada

    I'm curious what the 'it was soooo long ago' people against slavery reparations would say for the Native Americans who endured this. Something tells me that they'd still be against it

    None of this will ever be taught in school. I just found out these places existed a few years ago, and even then it was the whitewashed version, nothing about what really went on there

    In this thread and others on EE over the years whenever stories of racist horrors past and present were posted someone (we all know who) would chime in "Hey, blacks/asians/hispanics can be racist too!"

    If the people in the above stories said they hated white people to the core of their being, are they being racist? If so, are they being racist in the same way the people who did these things to them were racist to them?

    This all makes me so furious

    But hey, as some have said, they didn't die so it's all good

    Pupils at Carlisle Indian Industrial School, Pennsylvania, c. 1900
    Carlisle_pupils.jpg
     
    The first articles I read on these schools said almost exactly this, and was eerily similar to Florida’s new guidelines

    Basically it was “the children were taken from their homes and that was wrong but they were given an education and learned skills so they could live a much better life than if they stayed on their reservations”
    The tv show 1923 and the latest episode of Reservation Dogs address these 'schools' and really show the brutality the so-called 'missionaries' inflicted on those Native American children... Not the easiest stuff to watch, but I found it necessary so that these stories aren't forgotten in our history like those choads in FL/TX/etc want to happen...
     
    People agree that there are disadvantages, disparities, barriers, and disproportionately affected but when a program tries to address those inequalities this is the response
    ==============================================


    Attorneys for an Atlanta-based venture capital firm being sued over a grant program for Black women vowed Thursday to fight back against the lawsuit, calling it misguided and frivolous.

    At a New York news conference, the attorneys also announced that prominent civil rights lawyers, including Ben Crump, would join the defense for the Fearless Fund, which was founded in 2019 by three Black women.

    The lawsuit, filed last week in U.S. District Court in Atlanta, was brought by a nonprofit founded by anti-affirmative action activist Edward Blum, the man behind the Supreme Court cases that led to the dismantling of race-conscious college admissions programs across the U.S.

    The complaint could be a test case, as the battle over considerations on race shifts to the workplace. Last month, thirteen Republican state attorneys general sent a letter to 100 of the biggest U.S. companies arguing that the court ruling on affirmative action could also apply to private entities, like employers.

    In its lawsuit, American Alliance For Equal Rights argues the fund’s Fearless Strivers Grant Contest, which awards $20,000 to Black women who run businesses, violates a section of the Civil Rights Act of 1866 prohibiting racial discrimination in contracts. It claims it has members who are being excluded from the program because of their race and said it's entitled to relief.

    The venture capital firm was established to address barriers that exists in venture capital funding for businesses led by women of color. It runs the grant contest four times a year. To be eligible, a business must be at least 51% owned by a Black woman, among other qualifications.

    “Today, the playing field is not level — that is beyond dispute,” Alphonso David, a civil rights attorney who serves as president & CEO of The Global Black Economic Forum, said at the news conference. “Those targeting Fearless Fund want to propagate a system that privileges some and shuts out most. They want us to pretend that inequities do not exist. They want us to deny our history.”..............

     
    Florida teachers returning to the classroom this week face what many say are confusing new directives from state education officials over the instruction students should receive in certain classes. Among the most contentious: standards championed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis for teaching Black history, which must include discussion of how slavery could have provided beneficial skills to the enslaved and how mob violence against Black people included “acts of violence perpetrated against and by African Americans.”

    At a virtual training seminar by the Florida Department of Education — a session for teachers sponsored by the agency’s African American Task Force — none of the group’s long-standing members spoke. All have objected to the changes and say they were never consulted. One resigned in protest, calling himself “disgusted” with the new curriculum.

    In their place at the seminar were recent appointees from DeSantis’s education commissioner, Manny Diaz, and members of a separate “working group” that created the standards. The featured speaker was William Barclay Allen, a conservative scholar who has become the public face of the state’s efforts to rewrite how Black history is taught.

    Here are key details about Allen and the controversy.

    The 79-year-old retired professor of government and political science has a résumé notable for appointments to high-profile positions by conservative Republicans. In 1984, Ronald Reagan named Allen to the National Council of the Humanities, followed three years later by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. In appointing him to the commission, Reagan said Allen would prevent the commission from becoming “an arm of the advocacy groups in the civil rights movement.”

    In 1998, Virginia officials chose him as the executive director of the State Council on Higher Education.

    A Florida native who helped integrate his Fernandina Beach high school in the 1960s, he has taught at public and private colleges in Washington, D.C., California, Colorado and Michigan and authored or co-authored more than half a dozen books.

    Allen has repeatedly spoken out against affirmative action, and during his leadership of the Virginia higher education council he also questioned the role of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, or HBCUs. During his chairmanship of the federal civil rights body, he was castigated by fellow commissioners for the title of a 1989 speech, “Blacks? Animals? Homosexuals? What is a Minority?”

    That same year, Allen was caught up in a kidnapping case involving a high school student on tribal lands in Arizona. The incident became the subject of a U.S. Senate investigation. Allen refused calls to resign and suggested instead that the entire commission resign.

    In 1986, he ran for the U.S. Senate in California. (His campaign chairman was attorney John Eastman, who 34 years later would try to help Donald Trump overturn the outcome of the presidential election.) Allen, one of 13 candidates in the Republican primary, placed 10th and received less than 1 percent of the total votes cast.

    Allen declined an interview request by The Washington Post but explained in an email exchange that the 13-member working group “operated with a collaborative, consensual process, and the result is a product with no single author.” He noted that there was “no dissent.”

    His comments to others have been more elaborative. He posted a 12-minute video on YouTube and discussed his views during appearances on South Florida news station WPLG and the Megyn Kelly Show online. He told Kelly that his great-great-grandfather was enslaved but “had the pluck to seek out opportunity” and “made the commitment to build his family’s life in this country.”

    He also criticized Vice President Harris — who blasted the new standards during visits to Florida this summer — as “following a script in the name of an ideological agenda.”..........



    1691784320895.png
     
    CONROE, Texas (KTRK) -- Some Conroe ISD trustees want to crack down on displays of racial inclusivity and pride, saying they represent, "symbols of personal ideologies."

    One trustee says a child was traumatized by a poster showing different colored children holding hands and had to switch classrooms.

    School officials against this say a policy prohibiting political displays, not related to curriculum, already exists. The trustee who brought this forward didn't realize that.

    When it was brought to her attention, the trustee said she wants that policy to go further. Citing "a number of parents reaching out to her about supposed displays of personal ideologies in classrooms," Melissa Dungan asked her fellow board members to crackdown on them.

    "I wish I was shocked by each of the examples that were shared with me, however, I am aware these trends have been happening for many years," Dungan said.

    When pressed to share one of those examples, Dungan referred to a first grade student whose parent claimed they were so upset by a poster showing hands of people of different races, that they transferred classrooms.

    "Just so I understand, you are seriously suggesting that you find objectionable, a poster indicating that all are included," Stacey Chase, another trustee, said.

    Dungan wouldn't say whether she found that poster objectionable, just that she wants to avoid "situations like that" by having the board adopt stricter standards and adhere to state policies already in place, prohibiting teachers from displaying political items not relevant to curriculum………

     
    CONROE, Texas (KTRK) -- Some Conroe ISD trustees want to crack down on displays of racial inclusivity and pride, saying they represent, "symbols of personal ideologies."

    One trustee says a child was traumatized by a poster showing different colored children holding hands and had to switch classrooms.

    School officials against this say a policy prohibiting political displays, not related to curriculum, already exists. The trustee who brought this forward didn't realize that.

    When it was brought to her attention, the trustee said she wants that policy to go further. Citing "a number of parents reaching out to her about supposed displays of personal ideologies in classrooms," Melissa Dungan asked her fellow board members to crackdown on them.

    "I wish I was shocked by each of the examples that were shared with me, however, I am aware these trends have been happening for many years," Dungan said.

    When pressed to share one of those examples, Dungan referred to a first grade student whose parent claimed they were so upset by a poster showing hands of people of different races, that they transferred classrooms.

    "Just so I understand, you are seriously suggesting that you find objectionable, a poster indicating that all are included," Stacey Chase, another trustee, said.

    Dungan wouldn't say whether she found that poster objectionable, just that she wants to avoid "situations like that" by having the board adopt stricter standards and adhere to state policies already in place, prohibiting teachers from displaying political items not relevant to curriculum………


    Maybe they can avoid "situations like that" by telling the child's parents to stop passing along their racist bullshirt. No child is traumatized by a depiction of children of various races holding hands unless they learned it from somewhere.
     
    Maybe they can avoid "situations like that" by telling the child's parents to stop passing along their racist bullshirt. No child is traumatized by a depiction of children of various races holding hands unless they learned it from somewhere.

    The possible choices are:

    The parents are racist AF, and the child really was "traumatized" by the poster

    The child is fine and the parent is lying about it for their political agenda

    The child is fine and the trustee is lying about it for their political agenda
     
    The possible choices are:

    The parents are racist AF, and the child really was "traumatized" by the poster

    The child is fine and the parent is lying about it for their political agenda

    The child is fine and the trustee is lying about it for their political agenda

    Very true. The moral of the story is that adults ruin everything.
     

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