All things Racist...USA edition (2 Viewers)

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    Farb

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    I was looking for a place to put this so we could discuss but didn't really find a place that worked so I created this thread so we can all place articles, experiences, videos and examples of racism in the USA.

    This is one that happened this week. The lady even called and filed a complaint on the officer. This officer also chose to wear the body cam (apparently, LA doesn't require this yet). This exchange wasn't necessarily racist IMO until she started with the "mexican racist...you will never be white, like you want" garbage. That is when it turned racist IMO

    All the murderer and other insults, I think are just a by product of CRT and ACAB rhetoric that is very common on the radical left and sadly is being brought to mainstream in this country.

    Another point that I think is worth mentioning is she is a teacher and the sense of entitlement she feels is mind blowing.

    https://news.yahoo.com/black-teacher-berates-latino-la-221235341.html
     
    ATLANTA — Brianna Wise-Riley was working an administrative job with the Fulton County Superior Court when her manager gave her a great idea. Noting the food trucks parked near their office, her boss said: What if a nail salon could bring a manicure to you?


    Six months later, the 29-year-0ld bought an old school bus on Facebook Marketplace, painted it white, tore out the floor and seats, and added manicure stations.

    She found success booking weddings and parties, and now she’s looking to scale up. She recently learned about a grant program for Black, female entrepreneurs run by Fearless Fund, an Atlanta-based venture capital firm.


    The firm had planned to name the latest round of grant winners before Labor Day. But Fearless Fund has agreed to delay the awards as it finds itself ensnared in the nation’s rapidly expanding legal brawl over affirmative action.

    Edward Blum, whose lawsuit prompted the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down the use of racial preferences in college admissions, targeted the Fearless Fund in early August, claiming it engaged in “explicit racial exclusion” by operating a grant program “open only to Black females.”

    The lawsuit — which asked the court to prevent the fund from selecting its next round of grant winners — is one of the most prominent in a flurry of recent lawsuits and legal claims by conservative activists aimed at applying the Supreme Court’s insistence on race-blind college admissions practices to the corporate sphere of hiring, contracting and investment.

    On Tuesday, Blum also sued two corporate law firms, alleging that their fellowship programs — aimed at students of color, those who identify as LGBTQ+ and students with disabilities — exclude applicants based on race, and demanding that the programs be shut down.

    “Laws must apply equally to every racial and ethnic group in the country,” Blum said in an interview with The Washington Post. If not, he said, they become “the request for one group’s idea of social justice.”

    Blum’s lawsuits are “the beginnings of a very broad attack” on employers’ diversity efforts, said David Gans, director of the human rights, civil rights and citizenship program at the progressive Constitutional Accountability Center, a nonprofit law firm and think tank. “I think conservative litigators are going to be looking for ways to kind of extend the reasoning and rationale of the affirmative action cases into new contexts.

    “The legal battle is sparking concern among those who say efforts such as the Fearless Fund’s are essential for expanding economic opportunity to people of color and others. Wise-Riley, for instance, said she has struggled to find financing to expand her business…….

     
    At least five families who live in a predominantly Black Montgomery neighborhood woke up to racial slurs and swastikas spray-painted on the sides of their houses and vehicles Saturday morning.

    Otis Ramos said he heard his dogs barking outside and went outside to investigate at about 3 a.m. or 4 a.m. Saturday. That's when Ramos, who is Black, saw a swastika and a racial slur spray-painted on his home and vehicle.

    He would later learn that four other houses on Richardson Road, where he lives with his wife and children, also discovered racial epithets and swastikas on their houses and vehicles.

    Ramos said that he has heard that there are even more neighbors who had their homes vandalized with slurs in other parts of his neighborhood, Dannelly Pines.

    The person who spray-painted the hateful language also broke the window to his children's bedroom, he said.

    Montgomery Police Department spokeswoman Maj. Saba Coleman confirmed Sunday that officers are investigating the vandalism as a hate crime. "We ARE looking at the act as a hate crimes violation and will complete a thorough report with all pertinent facts for presentation to our federal partners," Coleman said in an email...........

     
    They were stripped of their clothes and scrubbed with lye soap. Matrons cut their long hair. Speaking their tribal language could lead to a beating.

    Taken from their homes on reservations, Native American children — some as young as 5 — were forced to attend Indian boarding schools as part of an effort by the federal government to wipe out their languages and culture and assimilate them into White society.

    For nearly 100 years, from the late 1870s until 1969, the U.S. government, often in partnership with churches, religious orders and missionary groups, operated and supported more than 400 Indian boarding schools in 37 states, according to the first investigation into the schools by the U.S. Interior Department.

    Government officials and experts estimate that tens of thousands of Native children attended the schools over several generations, though no one knows the exact number.

    Thousands are believed to have died at the schools. Many others were sexually assaulted, physically abused or emotionally traumatized.

    Now a reckoning is underway as Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe whose grandparents were stolen from their homes and sent to boarding schools, tours the country to expose the devastating legacy of the schools on families and tribes.

    At the same time, a major nonprofit group, the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition, is collecting tens of thousands of documents on Indian boarding schools to build an interactive, digital archive that is expected to launch later this year.

    “We made it through this Indian holocaust,” said Deborah Parker, chief executive of the Healing Coalition and a member of the Tulalip Tribes. “We made it to a place right now where we can finally talk about this pain and find enough strength to just stand up and say that our lives mattered and the lives of our children mattered.”

    The Washington Post talked to four survivors of Indian boarding schools who attended the institutions in the late 1940s and 1950s and are now in their 70s and 80s. Some have never spoken publicly about their experiences, which left them deeply scarred.

    One 86-year-old Kiowa recounted being sodomized by another student at age 10. A 72-year-old Sioux described being snatched from her first-grade classroom by two strangers in suits and driven to a South Dakota boarding school, with no chance to say goodbye to her family.

    An Alaska Native man said he spent six years being referred to by a number instead of his tribal name. A Chippewa woman remembers watching her mother cry as she climbed aboard a green bus bound for a school 100 miles from her home. She was 7 years old.

    Here are their stories.................


    A nonprofit group has identified 115 more Indian boarding schools than has been previously reported, offering new insight into the role of religious institutions in the long-standing federal policy to eradicate Native Americans’ culture through their children.


    For more than a century, generations of American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian children were forced or coerced from their homes and communities and sent to live at schools where they were beaten, starved and made to abandon their Native languages and culture.

    The U.S. Department of the Interior announced last year that the federal government ran or supported 408 such schools in 37 states, including 21 schools in Alaska and seven in Hawaii, from 1819 to 1969.


    The new list released Wednesday by the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition uses a different criteria, bringing the number of known Indian boarding schools in the country to 523 in 38 states.

    In addition to the federally supported schools tallied by the Interior Department, the coalition identified 115 more institutions that operated beginning in 1801, most of them run by religious groups and churches.

    The coalition scoured thousands of records scattered across the National Archives, universities, tribal offices and local historical societies to identify and map the schools as part of an effort to raise awareness about an often forgotten part of U.S. history…….


     
    Now you are asking if people are racist. They are, but that doesn't make the system racist by default. Well, it shouldn't, but that is not the case here.
    So you think all these racists, that you admit exist, just flip a switch to turn off their racism when they go to work as cops, bankers, real estate appraisers, teachers, hiring managers or literally any other job?
     
    A German museum created a designated time slot for non-White visitors to view an exhibition on colonialism, eliciting a right-wing backlash and prompting police to install a presence at the premises.


    The Zeche Zollern museum in Dortmund has allocated four hours every Saturday as a “safer space” for Black, Indigenous and other people of color to visit its “This Is Colonial” display, which began in March, with organizers saying the exclusive time slot would allow them to view the exhibition without facing “further (even unconscious) discrimination.”


    The purpose of the time slot is “to be considerate of people who are more affected by the topic of colonialism than others,” the director of local industrial museums, Kirsten Baumann, said.

    According to the museum’s website, admission to the exhibit during that time slot is not monitored and is instead based on “trust.”

    The uproar gained steam late last month after a video posted on TikTok appearing to show two White men confronting museum staff about the time slot and accusing the museum of discriminating against White people, said Barbara Rüschoff-Parzinger, the head of the Regional Association of Westphalia-Lippe’s cultural department, to which the museum belongs.


    Among those who shared the clip is Joana Cotar, a German member of parliament who left the far-right Alternative for Germany party to become an independent last year.

    Messages excoriating the museum and its staff came after the video, and they now feel “threatened,” said Rüschoff-Parzinger. She said in a telephone interview Wednesday that the footage had been heavily edited, and that the suggestion that White visitors are banned from the exhibition was “absolutely false.”

    She said that the individuals who recorded the video had entered during the designated hours and were neither requested nor forced to leave. The museum employees who appeared in the video were secretly filmed and are taking legal action for defamation, she added.

    The backlash persisted online after museum officials confirmed on social media in response to the video that the creation of the time slot did not constitute a compulsory ban on White visitors, and that no one would be prevented from entering the display.

    Nevertheless, some claimed the idea promoted racial discrimination. “I hope that every White person avoids this museum in the future!” read one of the many comments posted on the museum’s Facebook page………

     
    Guess this can go here
    =================
    CHICAGO (AP) — It took four and a half months for Shannon Ross’ life to unravel.

    Ross, who describes himself as Indigenous and a person of color, was arrested in Chicago in October 2019 on weapons charges and ultimately found not guilty. But that came only after he spent months in jail awaiting trial, lost his home, car, job and countless moments with his children.

    Ross couldn’t afford the $75,000 bond set during a hearing that he recalls lasted only a few minutes.

    “I had to lose everything to prove that I wasn’t guilty,” he told The Associated Press. “It messes with you mentally, psychologically. It messes up relationships; it messes up the time you put in to build your life up.”

    But Illinois is about to overhaul the system that upended Ross’ life. Illinois’ Pretrial Fairness Act, which abolishes cash bail as a condition of pretrial release, will take effect Sept. 18, making Illinois the first state to end cash bail and a testing ground for whether — and how — it works on a large scale.



    Judges can still keep people accused of serious crimes behind bars pretrial, but first would have to go through a more rigorous review of each case.

    Critics say cash bail policies are especially unfair to Black people and other people of color. A 2022 federal civil rights report on cash bail systems found that courts tend to impose higher pretrial detention penalties on Black and Latino people, citing a study that showed Black men received bail amounts 35% higher than white men, and Latino men received bail amounts 19% higher than white men.

    Cook County Public Defender Sharone Mitchell Jr. described Illinois’ previous cash bail system as “a cousin to slavery.”

    “The vast majority of people in the system are poor, and they’re Black and brown, and they have no power. It is an incredibly unfair system,” he said. “You go to a bond hearing, it sounds like a slave auction. People are talking very fast. They’re putting price tags on people’s freedom.”…….

     
    The downside is too many people are perfectly fine with snakes out in the open and are trying to convince others there's nothing wrong with snakes.
    It's not good that there are racists in the world and I wish there weren't any. Historically, racism spreads and rises to power in secrecy and anonymity more than it does out in full public view.

    Even the KKK rose to power in secrecy and anonymity. Look at how many of the modern day racists conceal their identities during public protests.

    I wish there were no racists, but I'd much rather know who they are, what they're saying and who they're saying it to, than to let them build their ranks and gain power in secrecy.
     
    About the Crown Act
    ================

    Last month, in the third year of a global pandemic, amid atrocities in Europe and battles at home over voting and abortion and basic human rights, the House of Representatives passed a bill about hair.


    The Crown Act (Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair Act), whose fate now rests with the Senate, seeks to provide legal protection for Black people and other minorities who face discrimination based on their hair.

    One of the nays, Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), called the bill trivial compared with other matters facing our country: “How about a world where gas prices aren’t five dollars a gallon? … How about a world where inflation isn’t at a 40-year high?” Jordan argued. “Those are the issues we should be focused on.”

    Jordan is wrong.


    The historical politicization of hair has created stereotypes and biases that affect Black people’s ability to thrive, and our laws do not adequately address this discrimination.

    Jordan and other critics have argued that the Crown Act is redundant because the Civil Rights Act of 1964 already offers protections against racial discrimination.

    But supporters of the bill rightly point out that clearer language is necessary to guide the courts in their interpretation of the law.


    For instance, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued a company called Catastrophe Management Solutions after it rescinded a Black applicant’s job offer because she refused to cut off her dreadlocks.

    In 2016, a federal judge ruled that the company’s choice was not a violation of the Civil Rights Act. The act prevents discrimination against immutable characteristics, those seen as unchangeable and innate to a person’s being.

    But the court decided that hairstyles “suitable for Black hair texture,” as the EEOC described them, do not constitute an immutable characteristic.

    Such rulings have far-reaching consequences — especially for Black women. According to the results of a 2019 survey of over 2,000 women, Black women were 80 percent more likely than non-Black women to say they’d had to alter their hair to fit in at work.

    The same study found that Black women whose hair was natural or braided were consistently rated as “less ready” for job performance.

    These biases can threaten the livelihoods of Black people, who have reported being passed up for promotions or even fired because of their hair.
In schools, there are countless reports of Black children’s education and playtime being disrupted because their hair is considered “inappropriate.”

    In New Jersey, a 16-year-old wrestler was forced to cut off his dreadlocks before a match.

    Administrators at a school in Orlando threatened to expel a 12-year-old girl because her natural hair was deemed a “distraction.”…….



    A 17-year-old Texas high school student has been suspended due to his loc hairstyle, in the same week the state passed a law banning discrimination based on hairdos.

    Darresha George told KTRK that her son Darryl was issued several disciplinary notices before he was suspended from Barbers Hill High School in Mont Belvieu, 30 miles east of Houston, for wearing his hair in a loc ponytail.

    Ms George told the news site her son had been told to remain away from his high school in the same week that Texas passed the CROWN Act on 1 September, which banned race-based hair discrimination in workplaces and schools.

    “I know he’s upset, and he feels terrible about it,” Ms George told KTRK.

    The school district’s dress and grooming codestates that male student’s hair should not extend below their eyebrows, ear lobes or the top of their t-shirt collar.

    A school district spokesperson told KTRK that the district’s code was not in conflict with the CROWN Act.

    Ms George told CNN that the school had initially reprimanded her son for his loc hair and for wearing frayed jeans to school.

    When he refused to cut his hair, Darryl was given an in-school suspension, she said. He received another five days of suspension on 8 September, she said.…….


     
    A 17-year-old Texas high school student has been suspended due to his loc hairstyle, in the same week the state passed a law banning discrimination based on hairdos.

    Darresha George told KTRK that her son Darryl was issued several disciplinary notices before he was suspended from Barbers Hill High School in Mont Belvieu, 30 miles east of Houston, for wearing his hair in a loc ponytail.

    Ms George told the news site her son had been told to remain away from his high school in the same week that Texas passed the CROWN Act on 1 September, which banned race-based hair discrimination in workplaces and schools.

    “I know he’s upset, and he feels terrible about it,” Ms George told KTRK.

    The school district’s dress and grooming codestates that male student’s hair should not extend below their eyebrows, ear lobes or the top of their t-shirt collar.

    A school district spokesperson told KTRK that the district’s code was not in conflict with the CROWN Act.

    Ms George told CNN that the school had initially reprimanded her son for his loc hair and for wearing frayed jeans to school.

    When he refused to cut his hair, Darryl was given an in-school suspension, she said. He received another five days of suspension on 8 September, she said.…….



    I will never get this. How does this young man's hairstyle prevent anyone from learning?
     
    A neo-Nazi has been arrested after he hung huge banners with antisemitic messages off an Interstate 4 overpass near Disney World.

    Jason Brown, 48, from Cape Canaveral, was arrested when the Florida Department of Law Enforcement confirmed that he displayed images of swastikas and other antisemitic symbols on banners that he displayed over a highway in Orlando.

    They initiated an arrest after agents with the FDLE and the Orange County Sheriff’s Office saw a video named "Disney Shock & Awe," where Mr Brown and the other demonstrators were seen dressed in camouflage clothing and carrying antisemitic flags and banners, the arrest warrant stated.


    He has been charged with criminal mischief, a misdemeanour.

    Mr Brown claims he is a member of the Order of the Black Sun, a neo-Nazi and white supremacist group that often spreads antisemitic propaganda, according to the Anti-Defamation League. The group is mainly based in Florida.…..

     

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