All things Racist...USA edition (1 Viewer)

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    Farb

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    I was looking for a place to put this so we could discuss but didn't really find a place that worked so I created this thread so we can all place articles, experiences, videos and examples of racism in the USA.

    This is one that happened this week. The lady even called and filed a complaint on the officer. This officer also chose to wear the body cam (apparently, LA doesn't require this yet). This exchange wasn't necessarily racist IMO until she started with the "mexican racist...you will never be white, like you want" garbage. That is when it turned racist IMO

    All the murderer and other insults, I think are just a by product of CRT and ACAB rhetoric that is very common on the radical left and sadly is being brought to mainstream in this country.

    Another point that I think is worth mentioning is she is a teacher and the sense of entitlement she feels is mind blowing.

    https://news.yahoo.com/black-teacher-berates-latino-la-221235341.html
     
    The racists are newly loud and proud, since Trump, but they are not in the same position they used to be years ago. I hope to see more stories like this, where ordinary citizens call them out.

     
    I've talked about this before, but I believe this is a main driver in all this stuff
    =====================================
    Gen Z Americans – who were born between 1997 and 2012 – will be the last generation with a white majority and will give way to a post-2012 “majority minority” generation Alpha, according to a new study of updated US census data.

    That change – when non-Hispanic white people will fall below half as a share of the overall US population – should come around 2045, the study predicts.

    Projections of the nation’s demographic makeup, including age structure and race-ethnic composition, also show that the fastest population growth is occurring among the older population while the youth population declines.

    “This [ageing] is not race neutral,” the author of the new Brookings Institute study, William Frey, said. “White Americans contributed substantially to older population gains compared to younger and middle-aged populations, which registered white declines.”...............

     
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    so, what you are saying is, we have been doing it the same way forever, nothing has changed, and its actually gotten worse, so lets just keep on doing it they way we have always done it, because it works so well.
    Get the ones who want to change. get them in programs to learn a skill that can help them when they get out, for example. But like i said, that would be met with "why do they get it for free" cry from the right..
    Sure there are some programs in some places. but they are few and far between.
    No, that is not what I was saying. Not sure how it came off like that. What we are doing now does not work. The tried and true method is to incarcerate and get the criminals out of society. The left has attempted to change to a model of rehabilitation in some form or another and none, not one has worked.

    It boils down to what is more important to you as a citizen? Being safe in society or the comfort of those that don't want to be part of society?
     
    We have not removed the family unit as the primary foundation of society. That is a lie.

    Who gets to decide who is and isn’t “taking personal responsibility for their actions”?

    Alcohol prohibition failed miserably. Drug addiction especially created by the pharmaceutical industry and Mexican black tar (read Dreamland by Sam Quinones) is only criminal because some politicians decided that it should be. So, no drug addicts are not ”where they should be.” When sentencing is reformed (sentencing for crack being different than powder cocaine as an example) so that White white collar criminals face the punishments as Black/people of color then we can talk about accepting responsibility. Trump and his enablers are an excellent example. Should Trump be convicted of charges brought in various indictments he should be taken immediately into custody and jailed.

    The death penalty is irrelevant.
    So the answer to you is making sure Trump gets thrown in jail. Ok. Cool. Good talk.
     
    This is one of the worst takes on anything I’ve ever heard

    ”We should have more love and empathy for people”

    Farb - “Quit being a birch! It’s survival of the fittest and hardest!”
    True story.
     
    No, that is not what I was saying. Not sure how it came off like that. What we are doing now does not work. The tried and true method is to incarcerate and get the criminals out of society. The left has attempted to change to a model of rehabilitation in some form or another and none, not one has worked.

    It boils down to what is more important to you as a citizen? Being safe in society or the comfort of those that don't want to be part of society?
    the 'do it the way we've always done it' model doesn't make me feel safe in society.
    Would you be on board with teaching them skills they could use when they get out, or are you against that because of tax dollars paying for it?
     
    No, that is not what I was saying. Not sure how it came off like that. What we are doing now does not work. The tried and true method is to incarcerate and get the criminals out of society. The left has attempted to change to a model of rehabilitation in some form or another and none, not one has worked.

    It boils down to what is more important to you as a citizen? Being safe in society or the comfort of those that don't want to be part of society?

    Tried and true method? So you think that worked?
     
    A Black man in the state of Michigan has had his drug conviction vacated because a white district court judge said the man “looks like a criminal to me,” according to a federal appellate court ruling.

    Earlier this year, 34-year-old Leron Liggins was sentenced to 10-and-a-half years in federal prison by US District Court Judge Stephen J Murphy. Now, however, Mr Liggins won’t have to serve a day of that sentence after the appellate court ruled that his conviction is null due to Mr Murphy’s conduct.

    Mr Murphy’s statement that Mr Liggins “looks like a criminal,” which came in January 2020, was apparently not the only prejudiced remark the judge made about the then-defendant.

    The appellate court wrote that it ultimately does not matter whether Mr Murphy was actually prejudiced against Mr Liggins — that the appearance of prejudice alone was enough to necessitate the vacation of the conviction.…..

     
    So the answer to you is making sure Trump gets thrown in jail. Ok. Cool. Good talk.
    Nah, but throwing Trump in jail would be a good start.

    Any other pointless comments you wish to make?
     
    They were stripped of their clothes and scrubbed with lye soap. Matrons cut their long hair. Speaking their tribal language could lead to a beating.

    Taken from their homes on reservations, Native American children — some as young as 5 — were forced to attend Indian boarding schools as part of an effort by the federal government to wipe out their languages and culture and assimilate them into White society.

    For nearly 100 years, from the late 1870s until 1969, the U.S. government, often in partnership with churches, religious orders and missionary groups, operated and supported more than 400 Indian boarding schools in 37 states, according to the first investigation into the schools by the U.S. Interior Department.

    Government officials and experts estimate that tens of thousands of Native children attended the schools over several generations, though no one knows the exact number.

    Thousands are believed to have died at the schools. Many others were sexually assaulted, physically abused or emotionally traumatized.

    Now a reckoning is underway as Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe whose grandparents were stolen from their homes and sent to boarding schools, tours the country to expose the devastating legacy of the schools on families and tribes.

    At the same time, a major nonprofit group, the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition, is collecting tens of thousands of documents on Indian boarding schools to build an interactive, digital archive that is expected to launch later this year.

    “We made it through this Indian holocaust,” said Deborah Parker, chief executive of the Healing Coalition and a member of the Tulalip Tribes. “We made it to a place right now where we can finally talk about this pain and find enough strength to just stand up and say that our lives mattered and the lives of our children mattered.”

    The Washington Post talked to four survivors of Indian boarding schools who attended the institutions in the late 1940s and 1950s and are now in their 70s and 80s. Some have never spoken publicly about their experiences, which left them deeply scarred.

    One 86-year-old Kiowa recounted being sodomized by another student at age 10. A 72-year-old Sioux described being snatched from her first-grade classroom by two strangers in suits and driven to a South Dakota boarding school, with no chance to say goodbye to her family.

    An Alaska Native man said he spent six years being referred to by a number instead of his tribal name. A Chippewa woman remembers watching her mother cry as she climbed aboard a green bus bound for a school 100 miles from her home. She was 7 years old.

    Here are their stories.................

     
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    A Black man in the state of Michigan has had his drug conviction vacated because a white district court judge said the man “looks like a criminal to me,” according to a federal appellate court ruling.

    Earlier this year, 34-year-old Leron Liggins was sentenced to 10-and-a-half years in federal prison by US District Court Judge Stephen J Murphy. Now, however, Mr Liggins won’t have to serve a day of that sentence after the appellate court ruled that his conviction is null due to Mr Murphy’s conduct.

    Mr Murphy’s statement that Mr Liggins “looks like a criminal,” which came in January 2020, was apparently not the only prejudiced remark the judge made about the then-defendant.

    The appellate court wrote that it ultimately does not matter whether Mr Murphy was actually prejudiced against Mr Liggins — that the appearance of prejudice alone was enough to necessitate the vacation of the conviction.…..

    There are far too many pieces of trash like this sitting on benches all over the country.
     
    From the article:

    He was told by some matrons that his mom was evil for practicing her traditional Native ways of singing, drumming and dancing. When he went home in the summers, he said, he would be so ashamed of being seen in public with his mom that he’d ignore her.

    In class, she said, teachers repeatedly told her “Indians can’t learn” or “Indians aren’t smart.” Often, she was ordered to sit in the corner of the classroom and wear a dunce hat, she said.

    And then there was the abuse. For two of the four years Klein attended Fort Totten, she said, she was sexually molested by the adult son of one of the school’s matrons — the term used to describe boarding school employees, regardless of whether they were women or men. She still has flashbacks from the sound of keys on a chain, because he would take his mother’s keys and let himself into the girls’ dorm and inappropriately touch her at night while she was supposed to be sleeping.

    At age 8, he was sent to Riverside — one of the country’s oldest and largest off-reservation boarding schools — and stayed until he was nearly 20, going home only twice. He describes it as “12 years of hell.”

    On occasion, his parents came to visit, but they had to stay in their car with the windows rolled down while he stood on the curb to talk to them. No gifts or money could be given.

    “We couldn’t go toward them,” Neconie said. “We couldn’t go near them.”

    In second grade, one of her friends, Lucy, did run away with another girl. They were caught and brought back. After they returned, a matron rang a bell. She ordered all the girls in Brought Plenty’s dorm to get out of bed. Get hand towels, she told them, and go to the washroom. Wet the towel with hot water, don’t wring it out, and stick open safety pins in it. Form two lines, she told them, and as the runaways walked by naked, smack them with the hot towels and pins.

    Brought Plenty became known by her assigned number — 199. When she whispered in Lakota to another classmate, a teacher told her to put out her hands and smacked her knuckles with a ruler. Another frequent punishment: She was taken to a hallway, where she was told to kneel and stretch out her arms with her palms up. Bricks were put in each hand and she was left in that position for hours.

    He will always live with what he endured at boarding school, he said. He watched as a 12-year-old friend was punched so hard by a matron for “mouthing off” that he was left unconscious and had to be taken to a hospital.

    “When he came back, his mouth and jaw were wired shut,” LaBelle remembered, “and he had to eat and drink through a straw.” The matron was never reprimanded. “It was a reminder,” LaBelle said, “what they could get away with.”

    She was 6½ years old and too terrified to ask who they were or where they were taking her. She had no chance to say goodbye to her grandparents, she said, and never saw her grandfather again. The men drove her to the Pierre Indian School, nearly 200 miles from her home.

    Once there, she was told to climb up on a stool. A matron “jerked my head back and cut off my braids,” Brought Plenty said. “I remember seeing them hit the floor.”

    When she asked for her clothes, a matron told her, “We’re going to teach you.” She took her to a dark basement in just her undershirt and panties and left. Hours passed before another matron came, took her to her dorm, threw a nightgown at her and ordered her to bed.

    These stories are absolutely heartbreaking.

    One of the arguments against reparations for slavery is that it was soooo long ago.

    These schools aren't ancient history. This was going on when people were dancing to the Beatles and James Brown. I think they lasted even longer than that in Canada

    I'm curious what the 'it was soooo long ago' people against slavery reparations would say for reparations for the Native Americans who endured this. Something tells me that they'd still be against it

    None of this will ever be taught in school. I just found out these places existed a few years ago, and even then it was the whitewashed version, nothing about what really went on there

    In this thread and others on EE over the years whenever stories of racist horrors past and present were posted someone (we all know who) would chime in "Hey, blacks/asians/hispanics can be racist too!"

    If the people in the above stories said they hated white people to the core of their being, are they being racist? If so, are they being racist in the same way the people who did these things to them were racist to them?

    This all makes me so furious

    But hey, as some have said, they didn't die so it's all good

    EDIT: plenty did die at these schools though
     
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