Increasing racist attacks on Asian (1 Viewer)

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Farb

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/02/09/attacks-asian-american-elderly-/

I will admit, I didn't know anything about these these strings of attacks and the murder of elderly Asian American out west. Really disturbing. In most cases, they have caught sub human scum that have committed these crimes.
In the case of the murder of Ratanapakdee, I sincerely hope the death penalty will be sought, although that is not possible in the state of CA.
 

Saint by the Bay

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I know the goal here is to try and get people to blame Trump supporters when the assailant is actually a black teen. It's predictable whenever the perpetrator is black in these situations. I'm just glad they got him and I hope he never sees the light of day again.
 

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I know the goal here is to try and get people to blame Trump supporters when the assailant is actually a black teen. It's predictable whenever the perpetrator is black in these situations. I'm just glad they got him and I hope he never sees the light of day again.
I saw a story about this over the weekend where two people were interviewed about the upward trend that doesn't seem to be slowing down with this. One was a 60 year old man who got sliced across the face, ear to ear, with a box cutter on a subway train. Not a word was said before it happened and he didn't even know it was coming until he saw the box cutter coming at him. The other was someone who works for a non-profit that helps Asian immigrants with whatever. Neither of the guests nor the host even mentioned Trump in during the piece, though a case could be made that he certainly didn't do much to quell the rise of anti-Asian sentiment after COVID and was complicit by dog whistle so he deserves a certain amount of responsibility/criticism for the state of race relations concerning Asian people in the US today.
 

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Here is a far more nuanced article about the topic. Regardless of race.

“White supremacy has always pitted racial groups against one another,” Jenkins said in an email, “These communities have long fought against violence and hatred while many in the Asian American community have stayed silent in the past. So yes, Asian American leaders do realize that we must find strength in combating this violence -- but, we also recognize that our African American brothers and sisters deal with this hatred and violence every single day of our lives.”

Some activists are also encouraging people in the community to listen to those who have been doing the work of community building in the field, rather than viral social media posts or celebrities. Long-term coalition building can make far more of an impact, which Janelle Wong points out is backed up by data.

After the Rodney King beating in Los Angeles in 1991 and the race riots the subsequent year, almost all the immediate attention was on Black-Asian conflict, she says. But decades later, in a survey done by AAPIData in 2016, Korean Americans had some of the most progressive stances on social justice issues and greater equality for Black Americans.
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-...s-black-communities-build-coalitions-n1258275
 

Dragon

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I saw a story about this over the weekend where two people were interviewed about the upward trend that doesn't seem to be slowing down with this. One was a 60 year old man who got sliced across the face, ear to ear, with a box cutter on a subway train. Not a word was said before it happened and he didn't even know it was coming until he saw the box cutter coming at him. The other was someone who works for a non-profit that helps Asian immigrants with whatever. Neither of the guests nor the host even mentioned Trump in during the piece, though a case could be made that he certainly didn't do much to quell the rise of anti-Asian sentiment after COVID and was complicit by dog whistle so he deserves a certain amount of responsibility/criticism for the state of race relations concerning Asian people in the US today.

And the term "the china virus" certainly was popular among Trump supporters. I even remember a few members here who kept insisting that it should be called that
 
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Farb

Farb

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Here is a far more nuanced article about the topic. Regardless of race.






https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-...s-black-communities-build-coalitions-n1258275
Why was your article considered 'more nuanced'? Because it was written with an extremely left leaning bias and interviewed activists?
The answer is yes.

The simple fact that immediately going to the tried and true 'white supremacy' battle cry that our media loves, does nothing to help the fact that some mentally ill people are attacking elderly Americans based on the color of their skin. In this case, all of the suspects I can find information on are black. If they were any other color, it would not change the fact that this is horrible and needs to be addressed. I am just afraid we, as a country, are addressing the wrong issue and because of that, nothing will be fixed in the actual communities.
 
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Farb

Farb

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And the term "the china virus" certainly was popular among Trump supporters. I even remember a few members here who kept insisting that it should be called that
I am one of those of members. I have no problem calling it the china virus because of where it originated. I also don't have a desire to hurt Asian people because of it.

If this was the cause, when do we see attacks on the British in the country for the "UK Variant"?
 

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I am one of those of members. I have no problem calling it the china virus because of where it originated. I also don't have a desire to hurt Asian people because of it.

If this was the cause, when do we see attacks on the British in the country for the "UK Variant"?
Lots of people in the UK are saying that they're pissed that it's being called the UK variant too. They actually asked those who were pissed what they thought should be done to name the variants and the most popular reply was to name them like hurricanes.

And who knows when we'd see attacks on Brits if the UK variant ever became the main strain over here? It'd also be a lot harder to pick out a random person from the UK when it's pretty easy to guess if someone is from an Asian country. It's just unfortunate the racists don't know that all Asian people aren't from Wuhan, China. Doubt they'd care though.
 

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I am one of those of members. I have no problem calling it the china virus because of where it originated. I also don't have a desire to hurt Asian people because of it.

If this was the cause, when do we see attacks on the British in the country for the "UK Variant"?

Why not simply call it by name? Covid-19 There is a very simple and specific reason as to why the official names never include location names anymore...
 

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Why was your article considered 'more nuanced'? Because it was written with an extremely left leaning bias and interviewed activists?
The answer is yes.

The simple fact that immediately going to the tried and true 'white supremacy' battle cry that our media loves, does nothing to help the fact that some mentally ill people are attacking elderly Americans based on the color of their skin. In this case, all of the suspects I can find information on are black. If they were any other color, it would not change the fact that this is horrible and needs to be addressed. I am just afraid we, as a country, are addressing the wrong issue and because of that, nothing will be fixed in the actual communities.

Not left leaning at all, but adressing the issues of how people of different minorities try to work together with a mutual commitment against racism. Or do you think that someone is immune to the effect of the hate speach that was being spread by Trump and his minions just because they are a member of a minority?
 
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Farb

Farb

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Why not simply call it by name? Covid-19 There is a very simple and specific reason as to why the official names never include location names anymore...
Who decided and when was it decided that viruses name no longer use the country or region of origin? Why did everyone not get the memo in regards to the 'UK variant'? Is is because the UK didn't spend the money on misinformation campaign or because they don't finance the WHO leaders?
 

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The mutation first discovered in the UK is called Covid -19 variant 174
 

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These attacks have been going on since this first started

This is something I posted back in the original EE Covid thread early on
==========================================================
Last I read they think a bat infected a pangolin? (Kind of anteater) and eating that passed to humans

And I assume that the Chinese have been eating both for centuries or longer

To me this is like calling it the Chinese or Wuhan virus

Just a subtle (or not so subtle) way to say

This is all happening because of THOSE foreign people in THAT foreign country

Bringing up the bat just adds to it

This is all happening because THOSE foreign people in THAT foreign country EAT filthy vermin because of their primitive backwards foreign ways
 

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Why was your article considered 'more nuanced'? Because it was written with an extremely left leaning bias and interviewed activists?
The answer is yes.

The simple fact that immediately going to the tried and true 'white supremacy' battle cry that our media loves, does nothing to help the fact that some mentally ill people are attacking elderly Americans based on the color of their skin. In this case, all of the suspects I can find information on are black. If they were any other color, it would not change the fact that this is horrible and needs to be addressed. I am just afraid we, as a country, are addressing the wrong issue and because of that, nothing will be fixed in the actual communities.
It seems like you took "more nuanced" personally. Why?

Your article, is from the Washington Post, quite liberal, yes? I think the difference with the NBC article is that it delved more into the why it is happening (or why people think, since odds are we'll never really fully know). So, it's more nuanced in that respect, while yours was very informative of the overall situation.

You say you didn't know anything about it, but then balk at some of the discussion on it, because you suddenly became an expert?

And I do agree, In general, the R card is played a bit too much. Mental illness is a thing, but we also have to realize that mentally ill people can also be very malleable to various ideas. Some people get manipulated by what they hear on TV, read in the news, hear on the streets. Radicalization, for example, doesn't happen in a vacuum. Saying someone is mentally ill or a sociopath doesn't mean racism is absolved.

That being said, I think an argument can be made for things in the "Racism" side of the bucket that if you make too many things "racist", but without a grading scale (i.e. kinda racist vs really racist), then everything becomes a problem, and there is no where to really focus your energy. You just end up with a lot of stressed out teens and 20 somethings.

Experts tend to live in their bubbles. So, it's important to realize that while what they say is technically true, it may not be properly ranked by significance.

i.e.

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Farb

Farb

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It seems like you took "more nuanced" personally. Why?

Your article, is from the Washington Post, quite liberal, yes? I think the difference with the NBC article is that it delved more into the why it is happening (or why people think, since odds are we'll never really fully know). So, it's more nuanced in that respect, while yours was very informative of the overall situation.

You say you didn't know anything about it, but then balk at some of the discussion on it, because you suddenly became an expert?

And I do agree, In general, the R card is played a bit too much. Mental illness is a thing, but we also have to realize that mentally ill people can also be very malleable to various ideas. Some people get manipulated by what they hear on TV, read in the news, hear on the streets. Radicalization, for example, doesn't happen in a vacuum. Saying someone is mentally ill or a sociopath doesn't mean racism is absolved.

That being said, I think an argument can be made for things in the "Racism" side of the bucket that if you make too many things "racist", but without a grading scale (i.e. kinda racist vs really racist), then everything becomes a problem, and there is no where to really focus your energy. You just end up with a lot of stressed out teens and 20 somethings.

Experts tend to live in their bubbles. So, it's important to realize that while what they say is technically true, it may not be properly ranked by significance.

i.e.
You would mistaken in your assumption that I took it personally. What I do take difference to is stating something as fact when it is clearly subjective. Just because someone agrees on the end result of an article or premise of an article does not make it more 'nuanced'.

It was last night that I first heard about this that rash of racial violence on Asians while I was drinking with an neighbor, who is Chinese and brought it up. He is not a white supremist, as far as I know, but you cant be too certain these days.

Also, would you please point out where I claimed, by any vast stretch of word play or projection you can muster that I stated I was an 'expert'? What I did do is read several articles from different media outlets on this today because of my conversation last night (slow day work).

One doesn't need to be an expert to see the absolute silliness in labeling racial hate crimes committed by black suspects as a 'white supremacy' issue. The only thing needed to understand how dangerous and disingenuous that is is common sense.
 

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Who decided and when was it decided that viruses name no longer use the country or region of origin? Why did everyone not get the memo in regards to the 'UK variant'? Is is because the UK didn't spend the money on misinformation campaign or because they don't finance the WHO leaders?
I talked about this in the coronavirus thread.

In 2015, the WHO issued guidelines about how to name a virus b/c of some of the unintended consequences that came from MERS (Middle East Respitory Syndrome). They advise not naming a virus after the region it came from b/c there are always idiots that blame people from that region for the virus.

Fast forward to today. We have a technical name for the virus (SARS-COV-2) and the disease it causes (COVID-19). It is a pretty simple and accurate description of the virus. Wuhan flu or Chinese virus, is not very specific, nor is it accurate. It is not a flu. Further, it is verifiable that some idiots use this nomenclature to abuse Asian Americans. So, given that it is not very onerous to call this COVID-19, and it is more accurate to call it COVID-19 and that calling it Wuhan flu will raise harrassment of Asian Americans (even if that is not your intent)... it seems petty to stick to calling it that.
This was predicted. It is of course not definitive proof, but there is a strong correlation between calling a disease by the region of origin and attacks on people from that area.

So, if someone tells you an action you are performing will hurt people, and you continue to do it, you should really be sure that the reason you are doing the action that results in people getting hurt is of greater benefit, regardless of your intent.

I should clarify that I don’t know that the rise in attacks on Asians is directly caused by calling it the Chinese virus, there likely isn’t a single cause. But it was predicted that calling it the Chinese virus would lead to hate crimes and that did happen, so we have a correlation.
 
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