What happens to the Republican Party now? (3 Viewers)

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    MT15

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    This election nonsense by Trump may end up splitting up the Republican Party. I just don’t see how the one third (?) who are principled conservatives can stay in the same party with Trump sycophants who are willing to sign onto the TX Supreme Court case.

    We also saw the alt right types chanting “destroy the GOP” in Washington today because they didn’t keep Trump in power. I think the Q types will also hold the same ill will toward the traditional Republican Party. In fact its quite possible that all the voters who are really in a Trump personality cult will also blame the GOP for his loss. It’s only a matter of time IMO before Trump himself gets around to blaming the GOP.

    There is some discussion of this on Twitter. What do you all think?



     
    Those Tea Party radicals are the MAGA Party radicals. They were the Yellow Ribbon Party radicals during both periods during the Bush years. And they were the Contract with America Party radicals during the Clinton years.

    During the Carter and Reagan years Donald Warren called those voters Middle American Radicals, or MARS. I read the book The Radical Center: Middle Americans and the Politics of Alienation and called them Martians.

    The college group of them called themselves Young Republicans, and maybe the non college group of them called themselves that as well.

    I blame that Alex P Keaton for them.

    Alex_P._Keaton.png


    Their average age is approaching 60 now.
    And they are still nuts.
     
    Those Tea Party radicals are the MAGA Party radicals. They were the Yellow Ribbon Party radicals during both periods during the Bush years. And they were the Contract with America Party radicals during the Clinton years.

    During the Carter and Reagan years Donald Warren called those voters Middle American Radicals, or MARS. I read the book The Radical Center: Middle Americans and the Politics of Alienation and called them Martians.

    The college group of them called themselves Young Republicans, and maybe the non college group of them called themselves that as well.

    I blame that Alex P Keaton for them.

    Alex_P._Keaton.png


    Their average age is approaching 60 now.

    Good news is they are easily identifiable and many live in one spot.


     
    Good news is they are easily identifiable and many live in one spot.


    They are easy to identify, they drive huge 4X4 pickup trucks with extended cabs and oversize tires. They drive them fast too.

    I never get to pass one, they pass me. Two times I've lost a windshield from a thrown rock picked up by their tires when they pull back in after passing me.

    They don't pay for what they break.

    When I see one coming up on me in my rear view mirror I always say to no one in particular, "Here comes Donald Trump!"
     
    They are easy to identify, they drive huge 4X4 pickup trucks with extended cabs and oversize tires. They drive them fast too.

    I never get to pass one, they pass me. Two times I've lost a windshield from a thrown rock picked up by their tires when they pull back in after passing me.

    They don't pay for what they break.

    When I see one coming up on me in my rear view mirror I always say to no one in particular, "Here comes Donald Trump!"

    If any one line sums up the current GOP...
     
    A Nevada computer scientist has gone to federal court to pursue the $5 million prize he is owed by MyPillow chief executive Mike Lindell following a ruling by private arbitrators last month.

    The arbitrators found that Robert Zeidman deserved the money because he had successfully challenged data related to Lindell’s false claims that the 2020 presidential election was stolen — and had thus won a contest Lindell had dubbed: “Prove Mike Wrong.”

    In their April 19 decision, they gave Lindell’s firm, Lindell Management, 30 days to pay.

    Since then, Lindell has not turned over any money, and on Thursday he asked a state court in Minnesota to vacate the award on the grounds that the arbitration panel had “exceeded its powers.”


    Zeidman’s attorneys on Friday filed a petition in federal district court in Minnesota to force Lindell to pay the prize, plus interest of 10 percent a year.


    They are asking a judge to confirm the legitimacy of the arbitrators’ award and to enter a $5 million judgment against Lindell’s firm. Such a judgment would empower Zeidman with stronger legal tools he could use to collect his winnings.


    “There are no circumstances under which I’m letting him run away with that money,” said Brian Glasser, one of Zeidman’s attorneys.


    Lindell said he would continue to fight to quash the arbitration award.
“It’s not about payment, it’s wrong. They’re just doing this trying to discredit the evidence and the evidence is all there,” he said in an interview Friday. “We’re taking it to court. It’s just all corrupt.”…..

     
    This is what Rs have wrought. We are now regulating and using the courts to enforce what kids wear under their graduation robes. This is so incredibly stupid and sad.

     
    This is what Rs have wrought. We are now regulating and using the courts to enforce what kids wear under their graduation robes. This is so incredibly stupid and sad.


    Children are not political pawns?? To Republicans they most certainly are.
     
    Children are not political pawns?? To Republicans they most certainly are.
    Harrison Central High School. That's just north of Gulfport. Not exactly a rural part of Mississippi.

    Also, I know judge Taylor McNeel pretty well from various events. Don't like this ruling at all.

    This is the worst part:
    “Defendants instructed that L.B. must dress in accordance with her sex assigned at birth—in other words, that L.B. must dress in accordance with the stereotypical male standards, even though she entered high school as a girl and has lived every aspect of her high school career as a girl."
    In the complaint, the ACLU says L.B. “has worn dresses, skirts, and other traditionally feminine clothing items without issue or repercussion, including during in-person classes, school-sponsored events and programs, and extracurricular activities” during the past four years of high school.

    “Defendants’ sudden decision to prohibit L.B. from wearing dresses and heeled shoes now, during the final and perhaps most important event of her high school career, serves no legitimate interest or justification,” the document says.

    The school district should be ashamed. They've let this kid be a girl for all four years of high school, but now she can't be?
     
    A new Texas bill could soon establish a taskforce using civilians that would have the authority to “arrest, apprehend or detain persons crossing the Texas-Mexico border unlawfully”, raising concerns around state-sponsored vigilantism.

    House Bill 20, authored by Republican state representative Matt Schaefer, seeks to create a new “border protection unit” that would deter migrants from unlawfully entering Texas using non-deadly force.

    It could include civilians with prior military experience among its members –such as national guards or former border patrol agents – who would be granted some immunity from prosecution for actions they carried out as members of the force…….

     
    Republicans have no right to complain about the deficit and they certainly have no moral authority to do what they are doing with these “talks” about the debt ceiling.

     
    Arizona 2024 Senate Race will be interesting...
    *
     
    AUSTIN — Texas lawmakers are scheduled to vote Tuesday on whether to require that the Ten Commandments be posted in every classroom in the state, part of a newly energized national effort to insert religion into public life.


    Supporters believe the Supreme Court’s ruling last summer in favor of a high school football coach who prayed with players essentially removed any guardrails between religion and government.


    The bill, which is scheduled Tuesday for the House floor, is one of about a half-dozen religion bills approved this session by the Texas Senate, including one that would allow uncertified chaplains to replace trained, professional counselors in K-12 schools……

    “There is absolutely no separation of God and government, and that’s what these bills are about. That has been confused; it’s not real,” said Texas state Sen. Mayes Middleton (R), who co-sponsored or authored three of the religion bills.

    “When prayer was taken out of schools, things went downhill — discipline, mental health. It’s something I heard a lot on porches when I was campaigning. It’s something I’ve thought about for a long time.”


    Those who object to the bills say they reflect a country that is tipping into a new, dangerous phase in its church-state balance, with people in power who want to assert a version of Christian dominance…….

    To some legal experts, the court in Bremerton created a vague, large hole where an existing balance between church and state had been.


    About the Ten Commandments bill, Harvard Law School constitutional law scholar and Bloomberg columnist Noah Feldman wrote last month that before Bremerton, “the Texas bill would’ve been an obviously unconstitutional establishment of religion, something prohibited by the First Amendment of the Constitution. Now, however, it comes under the disturbing category of ‘Who knows?’”

    “History and tradition,” Feldman wrote, could be used to both uphold and strike down the Texas bill. “Into the 20th century, many public schools started the day with Bible-reading and prayer.

    These practices, ruled unconstitutional in the 1960s and ’70s, are part of the American history and tradition,” as is that of the courts striking them down, Feldman wrote…….



     
    Last edited:
    AUSTIN — Texas lawmakers are scheduled to vote Tuesday on whether to require that the Ten Commandments be posted in every classroom in the state, part of a newly energized national effort to insert religion into public life.


    Supporters believe the Supreme Court’s ruling last summer in favor of a high school football coach who prayed with players essentially removed any guardrails between religion and government.


    The bill, which is scheduled Tuesday for the House floor, is one of about a half-dozen religion bills approved this session by the Texas Senate, including one that would allow uncertified chaplains to replace trained, professional counselors in K-12 schools……

    “There is absolutely no separation of God and government, and that’s what these bills are about. That has been confused; it’s not real,” said Texas state Sen. Mayes Middleton (R), who co-sponsored or authored three of the religion bills.

    “When prayer was taken out of schools, things went downhill — discipline, mental health. It’s something I heard a lot on porches when I was campaigning. It’s something I’ve thought about for a long time.”


    Those who object to the bills say they reflect a country that is tipping into a new, dangerous phase in its church-state balance, with people in power who want to assert a version of Christian dominance…….

    To some legal experts, the court in Bremerton created a vague, large hole where an existing balance between church and state had been.


    About the Ten Commandments bill, Harvard Law School constitutional law scholar and Bloomberg columnist Noah Feldman wrote last month that before Bremerton, “the Texas bill would’ve been an obviously unconstitutional establishment of religion, something prohibited by the First Amendment of the Constitution. Now, however, it comes under the disturbing category of ‘Who knows?’”

    “History and tradition,” Feldman wrote, could be used to both uphold and strike down the Texas bill. “Into the 20th century, many public schools started the day with Bible-reading and prayer.

    These practices, ruled unconstitutional in the 1960s and ’70s, are part of the American history and tradition,” as is that of the courts striking them down, Feldman wrote…….




    This would be quite attractive adorning the wall of every Texas classroom.

    SB8_10_Commandments_for_the_21st_Century_Tea_Makipaa.jpeg
     
    Make this make sense….



    Probably this part

    We, the successors of a country and a time where a skinny Black girl descended from slaves and raised by a single mother can dream of becoming president, only to find herself reciting for one.
    And yes, we are far from polished, far from pristine,
    but that doesn’t mean we are striving to form a union that is perfect.
    We are striving to forge our union with purpose.
    To compose a country committed to all cultures, colors, characters, and conditions of man.
     

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