Critical race theory (1 Viewer)

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    DaveXA

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    Frankly, I'm completely ignorant when it comes to the Critical Race Theory curriculum. What is it, where does it come from, and is it legitimate? Has anyone here read it and maybe give a quick summary?

    If this has been covered in another thread, then I missed it.
     
    “There is currently an African American History class students can receive credit for,” she continued. “The department encourages the teaching of all American history and supports rigorous courses not based on opinions or indoctrination that I don't like and agree with."

    I fixed Sanders's quote for her.
     
    Several surviving members of the Little Rock Nine, a group of students who in 1957 integrated Little Rock Central High School under threats of violence from white segregationists, are denouncing the Arkansas Department of Education’s restrictions on an Advanced Placement African American Studies course.

    The state is not barring students from taking the class but has cautioned that the coursework may not count toward the state’s high school graduation requirements. The Arkansas Department of Education has argued that since the course is still being piloted, it’s unclear whether it runs afoul of a state law signed by Republican Gov. Sarah Huckabee Sanders in March banning the teaching of "critical race theory."


    “I think the attempts to erase history is working for the Republican Party,” said Elizabeth Eckford, who joined eight other Black teenagers in desegregating Little Rock Central High School nearly 66 years ago. “They have some boogeymen that are really popular with their supporters.”

    The Arkansas Department of Education defended its decision, saying in a statement that, “Until it’s determined whether it violates state law and teaches or trains teachers in CRT and indoctrination, the state will not move forward. The department encourages the teaching of all American history and supports rigorous courses not based on opinions or indoctrination.” The state already offers an African American history course, the department noted.

    A spokesperson for Sanders did not immediately respond to a request for comment. When asked about the course on Fox News Thursday, Sanders responded by saying that she wants to focus on improving students’ performance rather than pushing a “propaganda leftist agenda.”..............




     
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    CHAPIN, S.C. — As gold sunlight filtered into her kitchen, English teacher Mary Wood shouldered a worn leather bag packed with first-day-of-school items: Three lesson-planning notebooks. Two peanut butter granola bars. An extra pair of socks, just in case.


    Everything was ready, but Wood didn’t leave. For the first time since she started teaching 14 years ago, she was scared to go back to school.


    Six months earlier, two of Wood’s Advanced Placement English Language and Composition students had reported her to the school board for teaching about race.

    Wood had assigned her all-White class readings from Ta-Nehisi Coates’s “Between the World and Me,” a book that dissects what it means to be Black in America.

    The students wrote in emails that the book — and accompanying videos that Wood, 47, played about systemic racism — made them ashamed to be White, violating a South Carolina proviso that forbids teachers from making students “feel discomfort, guilt, anguish, or any other form of psychological distress” on account of their race.
Reading Coates’s book felt like “reading hate propaganda towards white people,” one student wrote.


    At least two parents complained, too. Within days, school administrators ordered Wood to stop teaching the lesson. They placed a formal letter of reprimand in her file. It instructed her to keep teaching “without discussing this issue with your students.”


    Wood finished out the spring semester feeling defeated and betrayed — not only by her students, but by the school system that raised her. The high school Wood teaches at is the same one she attended.

    It had been a long summer since. Wood’s predicament, when it became public in a local newspaper, divided her town. At school board meetings, and in online Facebook groups, the citizens of wealthy, White and conservative Chapin debated whether Wood should be fired.

    Republican state representatives showed up to a June meeting to blast her as a lawbreaker. The next month, a county NAACP leader declared her an “advocate for the education of all students.” The county GOP party formally censured the school board chair for failing to discipline Wood……….


     
    How are we going to attract and keep good teachers? It’s very disappointing to see them treated in this way.
     
    How are we going to attract and keep good teachers? It’s very disappointing to see them treated in this way.
    What's going to happen is that there will be a concentration of good teachers in areas that are not banning books or going along with this BS that trumplicans are pushing. Students from red areas of the country are going to be in for a surprise when they get to college, if they continue to go to college, and find some of the bullshirt that they were taught was simply BS. Some of those students will be able to adjust; others won't. Red areas will began seeing a shortage of qualified teachers so they will lower the standards.

    Eventually, the government will need to act and end federal assistance to these areas that are pushing for teaching these lies and banning books. That is the only way to make it stop, IMO.
     
    Let’s examine Mr. Atwater’s career, from Wiki, emphasis mine:

    “Atwater's aggressive tactics were first demonstrated during the 1980 Congressional campaigns. He was a campaign consultant to Republican incumbent Floyd Spence in his campaign for Congress against Democratic nominee Tom Turnipseed. Atwater's tactics in that campaign included push polling in the form of fake surveys by so-called independent pollsters to inform white suburbanites that Turnipseed was a member of the NAACP.[8] He also sent out last-minute letters from Senator Thurmond telling voters that Turnipseed would disarm the United States, and turn it over to liberals and Communists.[9] At a press briefing, Atwater planted a fake reporter who rose and said, "We understand that Turnipseed has had psychiatric treatment". Atwater later told reporters off the record that Turnipseed "got hooked up to jumper cables", referring to electroconvulsive therapy that Turnipseed underwent as a teenager.[10] Spence went on to win the race.”

    Tom Turnipseed?

    Was he a hobbit?

    I'm sure that school was a great time for him
     
    My daughter is doing a speech on how the Black Panthers were the victims of a government surveillance and infiltration efforts that ended in the deaths of Huey P Newton and Fred Hampton for her speech and debate class.

    This is a true story, admitted to by the FBI and the Chicago police under oath. The main informant responsible for their deaths gave an interview with 60 minutes in the 90's to unload his conscience. Two days before it aired, he ran into traffic killing himself to relieve the guilt from the burden he could not bear.

    Most schools, especially in the south would have never allowed my daughter to give this speech.

    Most people in America think that the Panthers were a militant organization. They were not. They were community builders, children feeders and educators. They tried to creat a society within society to take care of themselves. The government murdered all of their leaders except one (Bobby Seale) who had to leave in fear of being murdered
     
    Thanks. Will do!

    Slavery is taught in schools and should be taught as it always has, just not through the identify politics lens.

    .........Many baby boomers were fed tales in school that masked the reality of slavery. Some teaching even emphasized the idea that Africans brought here in chains were actually better off.

    “With all the drawbacks of slavery, it should be noted that slavery was the earliest form of social security in the United States,” students read in Alabama history textbooks of the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s.

    And there was this: “A jail sentence or the execution of a slave was considered to be more of a punishment for the master than for the slave, because the slave was such valuable property.”


    A Virginia textbook of the same era told students that Virginia “offered a better life for the Negroes than did Africa. In his new home, the Negro was far away from the spears and war clubs of enemy tribes. He had some of the comforts of civilized life.”

    The punishment of enslaved people was described as rare and unfortunate, but necessary. “Most masters did not want to punish their slaves severely,” the Virginia textbook read. “In those days whipping was also the usual method of correcting children. The planter looked upon his slaves as children and punished them as such.”

    These benevolent depictions of slavery were not a matter of happenstance. They were a direct result of efforts by Confederate apologists in the early 20th century to remove negative portrayals of the South from textbooks and history books. In 1920, Mildred Lewis Rutherford, an educator and historian of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, wrote “A Measuring Rod to Test Text Books, and Reference Books in Schools, Colleges and Libraries,” a guide distributed throughout the South that proposed strict rules for what could be included in books for Southern students.

    “Reject a book that says the South fought to hold her slaves,” Rutherford wrote. “Reject a book that speaks of the slaveholder of the South as cruel and unjust to his slaves.”...........

    Philip Jackson, an American history teacher in Montgomery County, Md., remembers learning little about slavery when he attended public school in the late 1970s and early 1980s in the same county where he now teaches.

    “Pretty much all anyone knew about slavery was ‘Gone with the Wind,’ ” Jackson, who is African American, said in his classroom at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School in Germantown, Md., a growing suburb north of Washington. “I don’t remember ever going into any depth about slavery other than that there was slavery. The textbooks were pretty whitewashed. We never talked about the conditions of slavery or why it persisted.”

    For Jackson and many students of the time, the most in-depth learning they had about slavery came from watching “Roots,” the 1977 miniseries — based on the Alex Haley novel — that was shown for years in classrooms throughout the country. Jackson’s experience is similar to that of several generations of Americans. If they remember being taught about slavery at all, they don’t recall its importance being emphasized, and they certainly were not told that slavery was part of the foundation on which America was built...........

     
    Wait until he starts his arguments with speech laws you might have broken and quoting the TOS of this site, then you know you accidently touched a nerve.

    1. Discuss the topic, not the poster. It is not your job to question someone's intelligence, motives or ability to respond to you in the way you would like. In fact, when you re-read your post before hitting send, which I recommend you do, if you have used the word "you," it would be a good idea to ask yourself if you should delete that comment. Making veiled insults are bad enough ("anyone who thinks that would have to be stupid"), but most of the offending posts I have seen after reviewing the last couple of days are direct insults. The way Farb was treated in one thread is totally unacceptable. You don't like the way he or any other member posts? Do NOT speak to that member with disrespect. If you can't discuss the topic without referring to the poster (or "people who think that way"), you would be better served to step away from the keyboard. It is a relatively simple concept -- don't talk to or about other members in a negative or confrontational way.

    More form the guidelines.

    2. Discuss the topic. If your purpose in posting on a thread is to belittle, scoring points with people who think like you or make someone else look bad, stay out of the thread. The idea is to have an exchange of ideas. It is possible to learn something from someone with a different point of view. Each thread is not a game to determine who can make more points before others with opposing views give up. Try to offer something of value to the discussion. There is nothing wrong with stating opinions or supporting the opinion of someone else. That can make for better discussion. Instead of browbeating someone with a different opinion though, try asking questions. I'm not talking about questions leading to a gotcha moment, but rather questions that can help you understand why they think the way they do and maybe even help them question their own position without making them feel defensive. It's the difference between being an interested participant in a discussion and being a jerk.

    Miore guidelines:

    The idea here is to discuss political topics in hopes that we all learn something. It might not happen in every thread, but it can't happen at all unless we treat each other better. It's been said on here before and I think there is truth in it -- we should discuss topics with people who hold opposing views as if they are a family member like your wife, husband, mother or grandmother. You wouldn't insult them; you would try to gain understanding.
     
    The latest version of a groundbreaking African American studies course for the nation’s high schools says students should learn about professional football quarterback Colin Kaepernick and his decision in 2016 to kneel during the national anthem as a protest against racial oppression and police brutality.


    The Advanced Placement course plan released Wednesday makes that addition, alongside many others, and restores some terms and concepts — including the adjective “systemic” — that previously had been expunged or minimized in part because they were deemed too controversial.

    These developments spotlight anew the high stakes and deep political overtones of a course that is now in a trial phase and scheduled for nationwide launch next fall.


    “This is the course I wish I had in high school,” Brandi Waters, the lead author of the plan for the College Board, said in a statement. “I hope every interested student has the opportunity to take it.”…….

     
    TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) — A bill requiring instruction on the history of African Americans to include the sociopolitical circumstances surrounding slavery, dubbed the “Kamala Harris Truth in Slavery Teaching Act” was filed Wednesday morning.

    Senate Bill 1192 says instruction is approved for the history of African Americans, including before political conflicts that led to slavery, the passage to America, the enslavement experience, and abolition.

    The instruction also includes the sociopolitical circumstances surrounding slavery including the political parties that supported and adopted pro-slavery tenets to their party’s platform, and the American history and contribution of the diaspora to society.

    The bill said students should understand the effects of prejudice, racism, and stereotyping, and what it means to be a “responsible and respectful person for the purpose of encouraging tolerance of diversity” in society.

    Instruction will include the roles of the influential people who took the steps to “fulfill the promise of democracy and unite the nation,” to celebrate their stories and those who prospered under the circumstances.

    Discussions in the classroom may address how individual freedom was infringed by slavery, discrimination, and segregation, and how the recognition of these freedoms overturned the unjust laws...........

     
    TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) — A bill requiring instruction on the history of African Americans to include the sociopolitical circumstances surrounding slavery, dubbed the “Kamala Harris Truth in Slavery Teaching Act” was filed Wednesday morning.

    Senate Bill 1192 says instruction is approved for the history of African Americans, including before political conflicts that led to slavery, the passage to America, the enslavement experience, and abolition.

    The instruction also includes the sociopolitical circumstances surrounding slavery including the political parties that supported and adopted pro-slavery tenets to their party’s platform, and the American history and contribution of the diaspora to society.

    The bill said students should understand the effects of prejudice, racism, and stereotyping, and what it means to be a “responsible and respectful person for the purpose of encouraging tolerance of diversity” in society.

    Instruction will include the roles of the influential people who took the steps to “fulfill the promise of democracy and unite the nation,” to celebrate their stories and those who prospered under the circumstances.

    Discussions in the classroom may address how individual freedom was infringed by slavery, discrimination, and segregation, and how the recognition of these freedoms overturned the unjust laws...........

    well this will get nowhere. slavery did not have slaves just people doing work experience that just happened to be black.
     

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