Political Jargon, Slang and Phrases (1 Viewer)

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Dadsdream

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Thread merge placeholder. See boondoggle on Page 3 of this thread.
 
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Dadsdream

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Good afternoon, all!

Every endeavor (British sp: endeavour) has its own unique words, phrases, expressions and jargon. Politics is no exception.
Here, we can explore some of the colorful words and phrases, in hopes we can better understand each other and the sources we often cite.
Since politics frequently borrows and repurposes jargon from other fields of interest, our first Political Jargon Word-of-the-Day is borrowed from the world of poker, which borrowed it from the field of lumber milling.

1580150715755.png


whipsaw
verb
whipsawed; whipsawing; whipsaws
Definition of whipsaw (Entry 2 of 2)
transitive verb
1 : to saw with a whipsaw
2 : to beset or victimize in two opposite ways at once, by a two-phase operation, or by the collusive action of two opponents: "Wage earners were whipsawed by inflation and high taxes."

Verb

A whipsaw is a type of handsaw worked by two people, one of whom stands on or above the log being sawed and the other below it, usually in a pit. The tool dates back to the 15th century, but it was not until the 1870s that anyone thought to use the saw's name figuratively to describe situations in which someone or something is doubly "cut," or hurt. Today, the word is commonly used when discussing financial crises or losses. For example, just recently a chief executive explained in a press statement that his company was "whipsawed in the fourth quarter as key industries were hit by a rapidly deteriorating economy and plunging commodity prices." (The New York Times, January 27, 2009)


In card games, especially poker, for two players to raise and re-raise with one or more players in between who must call the raises in order to stay in the game.

 
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samiam5211

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Good afternoon, all!

Every endeavor (British sp: endeavour) has its own unique words, phrases, expressions and jargon. Politics is no exception.
Here, we can explore some of the colorful words and phrases, in hopes we can better understand each other and the sources we often cite.
Since politics frequently borrows and repurposes jargon from other fields of interest, our first Political Jargon Word-of-the-Day is borrowed from the world of poker, which borrowed it from the field of lumber milling.

1580150715755.png


whipsaw
verb
whipsawed; whipsawing; whipsaws
Definition of whipsaw (Entry 2 of 2)
transitive verb
1 : to saw with a whipsaw
2 : to beset or victimize in two opposite ways at once, by a two-phase operation, or by the collusive action of two opponents: "Wage earners were whipsawed by inflation and high taxes."

Verb

A whipsaw is a type of handsaw worked by two people, one of whom stands on or above the log being sawed and the other below it, usually in a pit. The tool dates back to the 15th century, but it was not until the 1870s that anyone thought to use the saw's name figuratively to describe situations in which someone or something is doubly "cut," or hurt. Today, the word is commonly used when discussing financial crises or losses. For example, just recently a chief executive explained in a press statement that his company was "whipsawed in the fourth quarter as key industries were hit by a rapidly deteriorating economy and plunging commodity prices." (The New York Times, January 27, 2009)


In card games, especially poker, for two players to raise and re-raise with one or more players in between who must call the raises in order to stay in the game.


Are you saying that all this time the Bear and Bull have had the same goal, and are working together to cut the stock market in half?

Someone better alert Jim Cramer.
 
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Are you saying that all this time the Bear and Bull have had the same goal, and are working together to cut the stock market in half?

Someone better alert Jim Cramer.
Let's try another one, tied to an actual historical event, which is still used today to refer to instances of overly-passionate and demonstrative pleas in Congress, in reference to the suffering of martyrs for a cause: "Waving the Bloody Shirt."

Bloody shirt, in U.S. history, the post-Civil War political strategy of appealing to voters by recalling the passions and hardships of the recent war. This technique of “waving the bloody shirt” was most often employed by Radical Republicans in their efforts to focus public attention on Reconstruction issues still facing the country. Used in the presidential elections of 1868, 1872, and 1876, the strategy was particularly effective in the North in attracting veterans’ votes.


"Waving the bloody shirt":
"the demagogic practice of politicians referencing the blood of martyrs or heroes to inspire support or avoid criticism."

... In American history, it gained popularity with an incident in which Benjamin Franklin Butler of Massachusetts, when making a speech on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, allegedly held up the shirt of a carpetbagger whipped by the Ku Klux Klan.
1580157676877.png


 

cuddlemonkey

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Two words in one day? Slow down, friend. We don't all have the same knowledge, experience, and education levels at our respective life stages.
 

CoolBrees

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Thanks cuddlemonkey-

The use of big words reminds me of a time when I was in college. History Professor used a term I was not familiar with, but being I was from a military family I knew better than to speak. May dad has told me about how speaking could get you killed in the rice paddies.

One of the other students, obviously raised by liberals, asked for me and the professor said he didn’t have time for ignorance and that if there weren’t any other stupid questions he would continue. Girl ran out crying.

I hope that clears things up for you.

great talking with you as always.
 

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Two words in one day? Slow down, friend. We don't all have the same knowledge, experience, and education levels at our respective life stages.
I agree, the title clearly says Word-of-the-Day. I think that's important to allow everyone time to ponder and fully absorb that day's word, and discuss its relevance if we choose.
 

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I can I get a jump on Tuesday's word?

Demagogue:

A demagogue or rabble-rouser is a leader who gains popularity in a democracy by exploiting emotions, prejudice, and ignorance to arouse an audience, whipping up the passions of the crowd and shutting down reasoned deliberation.

 

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I can I get a jump on Tuesday's word?

Demagogue:

A demagogue or rabble-rouser is a leader who gains popularity in a democracy by exploiting emotions, prejudice, and ignorance to arouse an audience, whipping up the passions of the crowd and shutting down reasoned deliberation.

That reminds me of this incredible song written by Sara Bareilles.

 
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Today's political term "Foggy Bottom" comes from the geography of Washington D.C. The term is often used interchangeably to refer to the U.S. State Department or decisions made within the State Department, often in a derogatory fashion.

Example: "It's a typical Foggy Bottom press release, wordy and confusing."

Foggy Bottom - Stretching from the Potomac River to the western edge of Georgetown, Foggy Bottom takes its name from the fog that naturally lingers here.


1580315205038.png
 
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Sometimes you run across an archaic word that has relevance in today's world and just sounds cool!

Such is the case with today's political word offering:

"He's not really a Republican. The man is a snollygoster!"

• Snollygoster
A politician who will go to any lengths to win public office, regardless of party affiliation or platform.
The term dates back to 1895 when it was used in the Columbus Dispatch. It was revived again in 1952 by President Harry Truman.

 

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Can someone look up the word ‘bombshells’?
It’s like I used to know what the word meant, but for some reason the meaning escapes me
 

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