Lessons from the Kentucky and Louisiana governor's race (1 Viewer)

< Previous | Next >

UncleTrvlingJim

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 8, 2018
Messages
827
Reaction score
1,641
Location
Virginia
Offline
I'm pretty sure there's going to be a lot of focus on how the Republicans or Trump might be in trouble based on the election results, my take away is different. I think everyone should be generally encouraged by results like these. Kentucky elected an almost entirely Republican slate except for governor, and Louisiana has a super majority Republican legislature, but voted for the Democrat for governor. Both states are most likely going to vote for Trump next year.

Both Bevin and Rispone were bad candidates. What this tells me, that even in this pretty hyper-partisan time we're in, people are able to still break free from straight line party voting.

I also think this should remind us that most people don't spend tons of time on political message boards, or hours thinking about this stuff. As much as I love debating politics, and so on, the net effect of things like this is to harden people's positions and increase partisanship. I think we're going to try for something different with this board, but human nature doesn't change. However, most people don't really spend that much time on this, they just live their lives, and while they have their political preferences and default party votes -- they will ultimately vote for a superior candidate.
 

crosswatt

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2019
Messages
215
Reaction score
421
Age
46
Location
Virginia
Offline
I think that, even though many won't publicly admit it, there is a core regret by many that they voted for the current president, and recognize that his administration has been the epitome of a bad candidate winning. To be fair, his opponent was also a historically bad candidate in her own right, so the "vote for the disruptor and see what happens" was more attractive than in a normal election cycle.

Which is why I think the upcoming Democratic nominee is important here. As long as there's a halfway decent option, I think the disruption has been ugly enough that reasonable people will move towards rejecting it. At least I hope they will.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
OP
UncleTrvlingJim

UncleTrvlingJim

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 8, 2018
Messages
827
Reaction score
1,641
Location
Virginia
Offline
I think that, even though many won't publicly admit it, there is a core regret by many that they voted for the current president, and recognize that his administration has been the epitome of a bad candidate winning. To be fair, his opponent was also a historically bad candidate in her own right, so the "vote for the disruptor and see what happens" was more attractive than in a normal election cycle.

Which is why I think the upcoming Democratic nominee is important here. As long as there's a halfway decent option, I think the disruption has been ugly enough that reasonable people will move towards rejecting it. At least I hope they will.
If the Democrats nominate someone that seems to be dignified, calm, rational and corruption free, they'll have a very good chance in the next election. If they let themselves get dragged into mud, then they'll have less of a chance.
 

MT15

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 13, 2019
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
4,120
Location
Midwest
Offline
I know what you say is true, Jim, but it’s so frustrating to me that “corruption” could be used by Trump supporters against another candidate. It’s like the biblical adage come to life - splinter versus log. 😡

To draw a parallel, this is why I’m glad the Democrats are doing this impeachment inquiry. Even if they don‘t end up impeaching Trump and even if they Senate doesn’t vote to remove.

Seeing truly distinguished people who have served our country with honor over the course of decades describe the current President’s corrupt actions has drawn such a stark contrast between what a true public servant does and what Trump does, that I find it hard to believe he can be re-elected.
 
Last edited:

Ayo

Spirit Grocer
Joined
Sep 28, 2019
Messages
804
Reaction score
1,962
Location
Toronto
Offline
I was wondering what - if any - implications there are for local elections relative to federal. What makes the difference between not voting for Rispone, because he's a terrible candidate and that being understood locally and yet, in statewide Senatorial election voting for awful candidates.

I can see how someone like Higgins gets elected, but the Senate seats are confusing.

I wondered about the messaging for local appeal in federal elections, as another implication as we discuss the merits of the electoral system. I understand what conventional wisdom says about narrowing focus, but part of me wonders, esp after last night and in Kentucky, whether or not that would be such a case.
 

Archies Ghost

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 28, 2019
Messages
601
Reaction score
477
Age
53
Location
Houston
Offline
Louisiana voted for a pro-life, pro-gun Democrat who has demonstrated that he governs according to his demonstrated lifelong moral code.

There is not a lot the JBE has done in Louisiana that I fundamentally disagree with.

There are lessons to be learned by both sides.
 

Dadsdream

1% Tanzanian DNA
Joined
May 17, 2019
Messages
1,255
Reaction score
904
Age
63
Location
Hancock
Offline
Louisiana's flirtation with Republican governors never eliminated the state's inherent Populism. Didn't even dent it.
JBE is a hybrid. He's also a good man, and I have deep respect for his military credentials.
Louisiana did the right thing.
 
Last edited:

Saintamaniac

Rise Sons of the Gold & Purple
Joined
Sep 28, 2019
Messages
541
Reaction score
1,035
Age
50
Location
Laplace, LA
Offline
Louisiana voted for a pro-life, pro-gun Democrat who has demonstrated that he governs according to his demonstrated lifelong moral code.

There is not a lot the JBE has done in Louisiana that I fundamentally disagree with.

There are lessons to be learned by both sides.
I get what you are saying here. However, let's not forget that 49% of Louisiana voted against someone who shares their purported moral code and their 2nd amendment rights because the letter behind his name was a (D). Edwards essentially is what Republicans used to be. So while I am jubilant that Edwards won, I don't share everyone's optimism about the national electorate.
 

V Chip

Truth Addict
Joined
May 17, 2019
Messages
725
Reaction score
1,163
Age
52
Location
Outside Atlanta
Offline
I said it in another place, but it bears repeating here: if JBE didn't change a single one of his positions on any issue but simply had a R after his name, he would have won re-election in a landslide.
 

efil4

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 14, 2019
Messages
709
Reaction score
1,074
Age
49
Location
Covington, LA
Offline
I get what you are saying here. However, let's not forget that 49% of Louisiana voted against someone who shares their purported moral code and their 2nd amendment rights because the letter behind his name was a (D). Edwards essentially is what Republicans used to be. So while I am jubilant that Edwards won, I don't share everyone's optimism about the national electorate.
the single issue voters that i have encountered are the ones that blame JBE for the oil industry stagnation. ( law suits for reparations regarding coastal erosion )
 

Archies Ghost

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 28, 2019
Messages
601
Reaction score
477
Age
53
Location
Houston
Offline
I get what you are saying here. However, let's not forget that 49% of Louisiana voted against someone who shares their purported moral code and their 2nd amendment rights because the letter behind his name was a (D). Edwards essentially is what Republicans used to be. So while I am jubilant that Edwards won, I don't share everyone's optimism about the national electorate.
I quite understand why that happened.

If the left views JBE's re-election as affirmation of continued 24/7 "Orange Man Bad" and the slithering towards socialism, then every vote of those 49% is fully justified.

I am not a resident but I would have had a hard decision. Vote for a decent incumbent that I mostly agree with and risk affirmation of leftist lunacy or reject anyone who remotely ties themselves to that clown show, even if only in party affiliation.
 

Infoman

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 1, 2019
Messages
194
Reaction score
143
Location
Ya mama house
Offline
I said it in another place, but it bears repeating here: if JBE didn't change a single one of his positions on any issue but simply had a R after his name, he would have won re-election in a landslide.
In this case I agree... but this is assuming that some other candidate would not have run against him with a D after his/her name... and grab the customary 90% of New Orleans votes that go to anyone but a candidate with an R after their name...

The partisan silliness is ridiculous on both ends... I really wish we could end both parties and make candidates run on policy and merits only. (I know, I know)
 
Last edited:

Archies Ghost

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 28, 2019
Messages
601
Reaction score
477
Age
53
Location
Houston
Offline
No one on the left views him that way, as you can see in this thread. That was exactly what Rispone was trying to sell us when it came to JBE though.
I believe you.

JBE's victory is already roiling the pot


Maybe some of the 49% were leftists who didn't want a pro-life D to win.
 

insidejob

Takes one to know one...
Joined
May 21, 2019
Messages
1,278
Reaction score
1,418
Location
Back in 70124
Offline
I believe you.

JBE's victory is already roiling the pot


Maybe some of the 49% were leftists who didn't want a pro-life D to win.
Wait, you think some of Rispone's 49% were Democrats who don't support JBE's pro-life stance? Rispone's is even worse. He wants it to be made illegal. I can't see a single "leftist" voting for Rispone, especially when you consider that a good number of Republicans wouldn't even vote for him.
 

coldseat

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 30, 2019
Messages
685
Reaction score
1,101
Age
44
Location
San Antonio
Offline
I quite understand why that happened.

If the left views JBE's re-election as affirmation of continued 24/7 "Orange Man Bad" and the slithering towards socialism, then every vote of those 49% is fully justified.

I am not a resident but I would have had a hard decision. Vote for a decent incumbent that I mostly agree with and risk affirmation of leftist lunacy or reject anyone who remotely ties themselves to that clown show, even if only in party affiliation.
It's weird to me that so many people would fear the "risk of affirming the leftist lunacy" on a national level enough to completely set aside a fear and apprehension of electing a completely unqualified candidate that is likely to bring further economic destruction and societal upheaval to the state, just because he's on the right. Even given the ample evidence of such destruction from the Jindel administration.

This is box I wish people would break out off, and I see it as more of a problem on the right than the left. A horrible and unqualified person/candidate if horrible regardless of party affiliation and ideology. Just because you'd go to church with somebody doesn't mean you should elect them to office or that they'd do a decent job in a position of trust.
 

JimEverett

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 30, 2019
Messages
1,763
Reaction score
1,369
Location
Nashville
Offline
It's weird to me that so many people would fear the "risk of affirming the leftist lunacy" on a national level enough to completely set aside a fear and apprehension of electing a completely unqualified candidate that is likely to bring further economic destruction and societal upheaval to the state, just because he's on the right. Even given the ample evidence of such destruction from the Jindel administration.

This is box I wish people would break out off, and I see it as more of a problem on the right than the left. A horrible and unqualified person/candidate if horrible regardless of party affiliation and ideology. Just because you'd go to church with somebody doesn't mean you should elect them to office or that they'd do a decent job in a position of trust.
I am curious why you think it is more of a problem on the right than the left.

One possible measure:

Of states voting for Trump - 7 have split Senate delegations (1 Republican, 1 Democrat), of states voting for Clinton - 2 have split delegations.

Another:

Clinton states - 4 states with Republican governor
Trump states - 8 states with Democratic governor.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

< Previous | Next >

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Fact Checkers News Feed

General News Feed

Top Bottom