All things Racist...USA edition (3 Viewers)

Users who are viewing this thread

    Farb

    Mostly Peaceful Poster
    Joined
    Oct 1, 2019
    Messages
    6,518
    Reaction score
    2,192
    Age
    49
    Location
    Mobile
    Offline
    I was looking for a place to put this so we could discuss but didn't really find a place that worked so I created this thread so we can all place articles, experiences, videos and examples of racism in the USA.

    This is one that happened this week. The lady even called and filed a complaint on the officer. This officer also chose to wear the body cam (apparently, LA doesn't require this yet). This exchange wasn't necessarily racist IMO until she started with the "mexican racist...you will never be white, like you want" garbage. That is when it turned racist IMO

    All the murderer and other insults, I think are just a by product of CRT and ACAB rhetoric that is very common on the radical left and sadly is being brought to mainstream in this country.

    Another point that I think is worth mentioning is she is a teacher and the sense of entitlement she feels is mind blowing.

    https://news.yahoo.com/black-teacher-berates-latino-la-221235341.html
     
    1707329668877.png


    1707329682238.png


    1707329712027.png
     
    Similar initiatives, sure, but I'd be a little surprised if the entire division adopted the inclusion guidelines from one subdivision wholesale.

    I'd be even more surprised if they distributed them by what appears to be taking the ABC document from 2020 and photoshopping this logo from Wikipedia over the ABC one.
    I swear every single post from the guy who originally posted this is faked or a lie or propaganda. He has the worst sources I have ever seen.
     
    I'm wondering if there isn't some sort of exemption for "creatives" when it comes to quotas. All of the positions listed are Directors, writers, etc.
    I think it's being mistaken for hiring standards. It's not hiring standards or requirements. It's how they measure how inclusive they are being. It's not saying we have to hire or contract this many people, it's saying the people or companies that we contract who meet these standards will be considered an inclusion hire or contract.

    The SAG and WGA both require studios to give them an annual report detailing their inclusion and equity hiring and contract. This document sets the standards for what counts.

    Notice at the very bottom it clearly restates the EEOC regulations prohibiting asking questions or hiring based on protected classes.
     
    Could be. This seems to hint at it, bolding mine:

    “Amazon Studios’ inclusion policy to cast at least one Black, Latinx, Indigenous, Middle Eastern or Asian character for speaking roles in each project could similarly draw attention. Legal observers note that the use of racial quotas are already prohibited under federal law. “The minimum aspirational goals for casting across speaking roles are 30% white men, 30% white women and non-binary people, 20% men from underrepresented races and ethnicities, 20% women and non-binary people from underrepresented races and ethnicities,” states the policyfrom the company, which didn’t respond to a request for comment.

    Diversity programs requiring applicants to come from certain racial or ethnic groups were on legally tenuous ground even before the Supreme Court’s ruling striking down affirmative action in college admissions, though there’s an exception for temporary efforts that seek to address a “manifest imbalance in a traditionally segregated job category,” according to court precedent.

    Minimum aspirational goals are legal. Forcing hiring to conform to those minimum aspirational goals is not. That's what will determine if Amazon has run afoul of the EEOC.

    The film and television industry union contracts require content creators to track inclusion and equity stats and to strive to be more inclusive and equitable.
     
    As one of the few Black women in the corporate offices where she worked, Regina Lawless took pains to blend in. She donned conservative blazers and low-wedge heels and tucked her hair in a wig instead of wearing natural hairstyles or braids.

    Echoing the speech patterns of her white colleagues, she avoided African American Vernacular English, spoke in a quieter voice and buttoned down her mannerisms. Even in casual moments around the watercooler, she constantly monitored how she carried herself and chatted about the latest episode of “Game of Thrones,” not “Insecure.”

    “I was coming in as a young Black woman and I didn’t want them to think of me as unprofessional or ghetto or pick your negative stereotype of Black women,” she said. “It was my way not to have people question my competence or my professionalism.”

    For many Black and Brown workers, this is as routine or familiar as breathing. Lawless was “code-switching, meaning she changed her appearance, speech and behavior to fit in and put others at ease.

    “Had I not code-switched and conformed, I would not have been seen as having leadership potential,” said Lawless, whose last corporate job was as head of diversity, equity and inclusion at Instagram.

    But the mental gymnastics came at a cost.

    “I joke with people that I wanted to retire at 40," said Lawless who today runs her own company, Bossy and Blissful, and has a new book coming out, “Do You: A Journey of Success, Loss and Learning to Live a More MeaningFULL Life.” "I felt like an 80-year-old because of all the added cognitive load I had to carry on top of just my day job.”

    Black employees are nearly three times more likely to code-switch than white employees, according to a survey of more than 2,000 full- and part-time employees conducted for Indeed by The Harris Poll.

    What's more, nearly half of Black employees see code-switching as a necessity at work.

    Diversity experts say the habit is becoming more common as the conservative backlash against diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) causes some companies to cut back on initiatives.

    Emboldened by a Supreme Court ruling last summer striking down affirmative action in education, conservative activists have filed a growing number of legal challenges advocating for "colorblindness" in the workplace.

    Nearly one-third of respondents who said their company has implemented DEI initiatives have code-switched, according to the Indeed survey. Nearly half of respondents whose company is scaling back on DEI investments have code-switched.

    Workplaces have become more inclusive since George Floyd’s murder sparked a national reckoning, hiring more people from diverse backgrounds and having more open discussions about race in the workplace. But cultural norms – how people are expected to speak, act and dress – have evolved more slowly.

    Code-switching is a form of self-protection for Black Americans, who regularly face anti-Black bias on the job, said Darin Johnson, a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication and a member of the Communication Neuroscience Lab.

    “At work, Black folks have dealt with a lot of racism and a lot of bias,” said Johnson who studies code-switching.

    Deep racial inequalities persist at every level in the business world, creating sharply disparate outcomes for Black Americans. But Black women face multiple layers of bias that prevent them from truly being themselves at the office, said Y-Vonne Hutchinson, CEO and founder of DEI consulting firm ReadySet and author of “How to Talk to Your Boss About Race.”.................

     
    A popular Lowcountry seafood restaurant owned by a prominent Black chef in Asheville, North Carolina, was targeted in an apparent racist attack when hooligans bum-rushed the business at closing time, cut the power and defaced the entrance before fleeing.

    No physical violence was reported in the Feb. 3 incident at the Good Hot Fish, but the invasion left renowned millennial chef Ashleigh Shanti stunned just two weeks after she opened the Gullah-inspired dining spot in Asheville’s South Slope neighborhood.

    Witnesses said the small mob ambushed the store and “shut the power off to our dining room while our last guests were enjoying their dinner,” Shanti fumed in an Instagram post following the raid.

    More than a week later, no arrests or suspects have been announced.

    On Facebook, Shanti described the episode as “racists doing what they do best.”

    “They then ran away, like cowards, when confronted by a guest and an employee but not before outfitting our entrance with this disgusting sticker,” she said, referring to an offensive decal the group stamped to the front wall of the business, which read: “How to ruin a white city,” and contained references to the “N-word,” as well as a star of David — the symbol of Judaism.............

     

    A 45-year-old man was arrested in the theft of a bronze Jackie Robinson statue that was cut off at the ankles and found days later smoldering in a trash can in a city park in Kansas, police announced Tuesday.

    Ricky Alderete was taken into custody earlier this month in a kidnapping case and charged Monday with four counts stemming from the theft and a 2022 case, records show. Wichita police Lt. Aaron Moses said there was no evidence it was a "hate-motivated crime” but rather the intent was to sell the metal for scrap.

    Wichita police Chief Joe Sullivan said it was “only the first arrest” and that there were more to come. He did not specify how police determined Alderete was a suspect in the theft.

    "When you try to take something from this community, it won’t tolerate it,” he said, adding that he was eager to share more details about the investigation after more suspects are in custody.............

     
    posted on EE also
    ===============

    NORMANDY, Mo. – A St. Louis Catholic teacher has been let go after her lesson on slavery raised concerns.

    School officials said that an art lesson for first-grade students last week was meant to illustrate the dynamics of slavery through a re-enactment of slavery ownership. It is said that the teacher is white.

    Aveona McLemore’s son is a student in the class.

    “He stated that two young white children, young white women, were assigned to be slave owners, a little girl was assigned to be Harriet Tubman and she crawled under tables,” she said. “The classroom was separated—blacks on one side and whites on the other side—and he was told to give her directions to go north, south, east, and west, re-enacting the underground railroad.”

    Administrators said there was no malicious intent but do believe the assignment was inappropriate and potentially traumatizing.

    “(My son) told me from his own mouth, ‘I learned that white people are better than black people,’ so as a parent, that crushed me,” McLemore said.

    The Archdiocese of St. Louis sent a letter home to parents informing them of the situation.

    “The lesson plan that was shared with the first grade students is entirely unacceptable and inappropriate for students that age and its behavior that won’t be tolerated,” Brecht Mulvihill from the Archdiocese of St. Louis said...............

     


    In a recent incident at a Sephora store located in Boston’s Prudential Center, a situation involving a group of teenage girls has sparked widespread controversy and condemnation. Captured in a now-viral video shared on TikTok, these teens were observed engaging in behavior that has been widely criticized as racially insensitive.

    According to the New York Post, the video showcased at least two of the girls applying cosmetics significantly darker than their skin tones, an act perceived by many as an attempt at blackface. The incident was brought to light by Temi Ojora, a track and field athlete from the University of Southern California, who was present during the occurrence. Ojora expressed her dismay and disturbance over the actions of the teenagers and their accompanying adults, noting their inappropriate laughter and behavior while applying the makeup.

    A Sephora employee confronted the group’s adult chaperone about the inappropriateness of their actions, highlighting the potential repercussions, such as the impact on future employment opportunities and college admissions, not to mention the deep offense it causes. Despite the employee’s intervention, it was reported that the chaperone seemed to dismiss the concerns raised, further exacerbating the situation. Following the confrontation, Ojora claimed the teen’s mother approached her and one of the teenagers, who demanded she delete the footage.

    Sephora has since issued a statement condemning the behavior, emphasizing that the individuals involved were asked to leave the store due to their unacceptable conduct. The beauty retailer firmly stated that it does not tolerate such actions and is disappointed by the events in its Boston location.

    “We are extremely disappointed by the behavior of these shoppers at our Prudential Center location, and as such, they were asked to leave our premises. Under no circumstance is this type of behavior tolerated at Sephora.”

     
    posted on EE also
    ===============

    NORMANDY, Mo. – A St. Louis Catholic teacher has been let go after her lesson on slavery raised concerns.

    School officials said that an art lesson for first-grade students last week was meant to illustrate the dynamics of slavery through a re-enactment of slavery ownership. It is said that the teacher is white.

    Aveona McLemore’s son is a student in the class.

    “He stated that two young white children, young white women, were assigned to be slave owners, a little girl was assigned to be Harriet Tubman and she crawled under tables,” she said. “The classroom was separated—blacks on one side and whites on the other side—and he was told to give her directions to go north, south, east, and west, re-enacting the underground railroad.”

    Administrators said there was no malicious intent but do believe the assignment was inappropriate and potentially traumatizing.

    “(My son) told me from his own mouth, ‘I learned that white people are better than black people,’ so as a parent, that crushed me,” McLemore said.

    The Archdiocese of St. Louis sent a letter home to parents informing them of the situation.

    “The lesson plan that was shared with the first grade students is entirely unacceptable and inappropriate for students that age and its behavior that won’t be tolerated,” Brecht Mulvihill from the Archdiocese of St. Louis said...............

    Perfectly acceptable in Florida?
     
    As one of the few Black women in the corporate offices where she worked, Regina Lawless took pains to blend in. She donned conservative blazers and low-wedge heels and tucked her hair in a wig instead of wearing natural hairstyles or braids.

    Echoing the speech patterns of her white colleagues, she avoided African American Vernacular English, spoke in a quieter voice and buttoned down her mannerisms. Even in casual moments around the watercooler, she constantly monitored how she carried herself and chatted about the latest episode of “Game of Thrones,” not “Insecure.”

    “I was coming in as a young Black woman and I didn’t want them to think of me as unprofessional or ghetto or pick your negative stereotype of Black women,” she said. “It was my way not to have people question my competence or my professionalism.”

    For many Black and Brown workers, this is as routine or familiar as breathing. Lawless was “code-switching, meaning she changed her appearance, speech and behavior to fit in and put others at ease.

    “Had I not code-switched and conformed, I would not have been seen as having leadership potential,” said Lawless, whose last corporate job was as head of diversity, equity and inclusion at Instagram.

    But the mental gymnastics came at a cost.

    “I joke with people that I wanted to retire at 40," said Lawless who today runs her own company, Bossy and Blissful, and has a new book coming out, “Do You: A Journey of Success, Loss and Learning to Live a More MeaningFULL Life.” "I felt like an 80-year-old because of all the added cognitive load I had to carry on top of just my day job.”

    Black employees are nearly three times more likely to code-switch than white employees, according to a survey of more than 2,000 full- and part-time employees conducted for Indeed by The Harris Poll.

    What's more, nearly half of Black employees see code-switching as a necessity at work.

    Diversity experts say the habit is becoming more common as the conservative backlash against diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) causes some companies to cut back on initiatives.

    Emboldened by a Supreme Court ruling last summer striking down affirmative action in education, conservative activists have filed a growing number of legal challenges advocating for "colorblindness" in the workplace.

    Nearly one-third of respondents who said their company has implemented DEI initiatives have code-switched, according to the Indeed survey. Nearly half of respondents whose company is scaling back on DEI investments have code-switched.

    Workplaces have become more inclusive since George Floyd’s murder sparked a national reckoning, hiring more people from diverse backgrounds and having more open discussions about race in the workplace. But cultural norms – how people are expected to speak, act and dress – have evolved more slowly.

    Code-switching is a form of self-protection for Black Americans, who regularly face anti-Black bias on the job, said Darin Johnson, a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication and a member of the Communication Neuroscience Lab.

    “At work, Black folks have dealt with a lot of racism and a lot of bias,” said Johnson who studies code-switching.

    Deep racial inequalities persist at every level in the business world, creating sharply disparate outcomes for Black Americans. But Black women face multiple layers of bias that prevent them from truly being themselves at the office, said Y-Vonne Hutchinson, CEO and founder of DEI consulting firm ReadySet and author of “How to Talk to Your Boss About Race.”.................

    We’re post-racial, don’t you know.
     
    Are you saying they made up the racial taunts?
    Do you have proof otherwise? Last I saw the refs didn't think so either. Sounds a lot like the BYU fiasco. If you are told every white person is racist then you have to create that some how since it isn't really true.
     

    Create an account or login to comment

    You must be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create account

    Create an account on our community. It's easy!

    Log in

    Already have an account? Log in here.

    Advertisement

    General News Feed

    Fact Checkers News Feed

    Sponsored

    Back
    Top Bottom