Increasing racist attacks on Asian (2 Viewers)

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Farb

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/02/09/attacks-asian-american-elderly-/

I will admit, I didn't know anything about these these strings of attacks and the murder of elderly Asian American out west. Really disturbing. In most cases, they have caught sub human scum that have committed these crimes.
In the case of the murder of Ratanapakdee, I sincerely hope the death penalty will be sought, although that is not possible in the state of CA.
 

DaveXA

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Like Brandon said it depends on what happens afterwards

If your wife is asked and says Vienna Virginia, is that the end of it or are more questions asked

And with so many things some are asking out of a genuine innocent curiosity and with others there can be an edge or agenda
Yeah, she actually gets what country are you from pretty regularly. Asians even ask each other that because they're obviously not all from the same country. And usually, my wife, when asked where she's from, just says she's from Korea because she knows it's coming anyway, lol.

But yea, some people have an agenda, but I just go with it until it becomes clear that there's an agenda.
 

brandon

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Yeah, she actually gets what country are you from pretty regularly. Asians even ask each other that because they're obviously not all from the same country. And usually, my wife, when asked where she's from, just says she's from Korea because she knows it's coming anyway, lol.

But yea, some people have an agenda, but I just go with it until it becomes clear that there's an agenda.
And that’s racist.
 

samiam5211

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That's possible, as asking someone where there from does typically come up in conversation (though I would argue that it usually comes up later in conversation when dealing with a white person than someone of Asian descent).

And the difference is that when the white person says "I'm from San Diego," you say "oh, that's cool," not "yea, but where are you REALLY from? Where are you parents from?"
Maybe, but that doesn’t have to be because they are “otherizing” the person. At least not intentionally.

People always end up asking me about food recommendations or where to stay when they are going to New Orleans because they know I am from Louisiana.

Yes, there are plenty of people who are being passively racist when they say “Where are you REALLY from”, but I don’t think it’s good for society if we become afraid to be inquisitive.

If someone is a 3rd generation immigrant, they should feel comfortable telling people about where their grandparents came from, and we should feel comfortable asking about it. I don’t mean to random people on the street, but people who interact with each other on at least a semi-regular basis.
 

wardorican

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I have no doubt majority of those people above who did those things have 2 things in common..
I remember seeing this about 10 years ago, this thread made me look it up.
When he bows, I straight up laughed out loud.. everyone in the house is asleep.. oops.
 

DaveXA

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When he bows, I straight up laughed out loud.. everyone in the house is asleep.. oops.
Just watching the vid now. Lol. And it's true. This sort of explains why my wife just says she's Korean. She's not interested in going through that whole routine. She's done it enough times.

If I ask an Asian where they're from and they say Washington, DC, I don't ask what country culture or whatever. Typically when talking about getting to know someone, I try to talk more about school or work more than where from. Sometimes you can learn more about a person's interests from what we studied or what career we pursue.

Everyone is a little different and some people open up pretty quickly, but usually, it takes time for people to get to know one another.

Honestly, it's been so long since I last got out and chatted it up with the neighbors, coworkers. I feel so out of practice. I love working from home, but my social skills have probably gone to pot. Stupid Covid. Meh.
 

DaveXA

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Sorry, I should have been more clear with my quotation.

The first sentence.
Thanks for clarifying. I think it can be. Intent and movies do matter. I think it can be a normal part of a conversation, or it can have racist intent. If it's one of the first questions you ask a stranger, that's likely problematic. If it's asked in the course of a couple of friends getting to know one another, that's different. It depends on why the question is asked.
 

Bigdaddysaints

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I think it makes a big difference in how you ask. if you are just like, where are you from, it comes off as you are not a real american.
The more correct way to ask if you are really interested is to ask them about their heritage. But again, its not really something you start off a conversation with, more of an extended conversation piece.
My moms side of the family is from Puerto Rico. So all my aunts and uncles on that side are half PR. I have an Uncle who shares stuff on Facebook like a big confederate flag saying share if you are not ashamed of your heritage, and stuff like that.. My mom may comment on it and try to call him out, but he never replies. I don't even waste my time with that kind of dumb.
 

wardorican

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Thanks for clarifying. I think it can be. Intent and movies do matter. I think it can be a normal part of a conversation, or it can have racist intent. If it's one of the first questions you ask a stranger, that's likely problematic. If it's asked in the course of a couple of friends getting to know one another, that's different. It depends on why the question is asked.
Yeah, and it is very different with other Asians are asking her, kind of like how Most Latino's want know what country you're family is from, when they can usually tell.

Of course, most don't ask "where is your family from?" they'll ask, "Are you Puerto Rican?"
 

insidejob

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A couple of things I want to touch on quickly.

More about what has been happening the last year

==================================

MARIETTA, Georgia — “I was in line at the pharmacy when a woman approached me and sprayed Lysol all over me. She was yelling, ‘You’re the infection. Go home. We don’t want you here!’ I was in shock and cried as I left the building. No one came to my help.”
First, this was in one of the quoted incidents from the article you posted and it really pisses me off. It pisses me off because not only is it part of the problem, it's part of not fixing the problem and making each subsequent situation these cowards who did nothing witness seem more and more normal and acceptable. There had to be someone in that line who knew that what was happening was absolutely wrong and didn't have the guts to stand up for this person - who I'm willing to bet was a woman. I don't know about y'all, but if I was in line at Walgreens and something like that happened, I wouldn't have to think for a second before I got between trhe nut with the Lysol and the person she was harassing - and technically assaulting.

Yeah, she actually gets what country are you from pretty regularly. Asians even ask each other that because they're obviously not all from the same country. And usually, my wife, when asked where she's from, just says she's from Korea because she knows it's coming anyway, lol.

But yea, some people have an agenda, but I just go with it until it becomes clear that there's an agenda.
One of my life-long best friends is was born in Laos and her family came here when she was 4 months old. She grew up in the Village in the East which is basically 100% Vietnamese (if you aren't familiar with that part of New Orleans - it is pretty much the last part of New Orleans proper before you hit swamp land when heading to Slidell). I didn't know this until I met her, but apparently lots of Vietnamese people have very racist views when it comes to non-Vietnamese Asians - or at least Laosians. She was teased and bullied from pre-school up until high school. Even after I met her in high school, I saw how the Vietnamese girls treated her, and how they treated me when I was with her, and it wasn't anything close to how they treated other Vietnamese kids or even people of other races (or how they treated me when I wasn't with her). It was specifically reserved for her because she was the only person from Laos at McMain. At the time, McMain was probably the most racially diverse high school in the city. Something like 30% of the students were Vietnamese when I was there.

Whenever I have asked someone from Asia what country their family comes from, it definitely wasn't coming from some kind of racist place. I've also never started a conversation with the question like I would only talk to them if they were from ___________. Now that I am thinking about it, I don't think I have ever asked the question unless it comes up in an organic sort of way that is relevant to the conversation being had.

When I get asked where I'm from (or the more typical New Orleans "Where'd you go to high school?" - which seems to be losing its cultural significance over the years) I've never felt like I was being asked for my ancestry.com profile but I think that's how lots of people from Asian counties feel.

I'm not really trying to make any kind of point, just adding my 0.00000000000000000000000000000002 BTC to the conversation
 
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Optimus Prime

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Even in retirement communities
=======================
After running a restaurant in Indiana for 20 years, Byong Choi and his wife retired to Leisure World in Seal Beach.

They enjoyed the community’s golf course, gyms, movie nights and field trips.

As immigrants from South Korea, they never experienced racism at Leisure World — until after Byong Choi’s recent death.

A letter addressed to Choi’s widow arrived in the mail on Monday.

“Now that Byong is gone makes it one less Asian to put up with in Leisure World,” said the letter, written in cursive on yellow notebook paper. “You frickin Asians are taking over our American community!”

The Chois’ daughter, Sue Choi, opened the letter. She never gave it to her mother, to spare the 82-year-old woman the knowledge that someone, likely a neighbor, despised her for being Asian.

On the heels of her husband’s death, it would have been too much to bear.

“I’m not sad. No, I’m angry and I want to talk about it,” said Claudia Choi, 46, another of the Chois’ four daughters. “I want to tell people that this is happening because I think that people just assume that this doesn’t happen in real life.”.................

Anti-Asian letter targets Korean American widow in Seal Beach - Los Angeles Times (latimes.com)
 

Optimus Prime

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On Asian names

I've seen this happen both in school and work
===================================

For many of us Asians living in the West, our name is a tricky subject that often makes us feel self-conscious and embarrassed when people try to pronounce it. Growing up attending American international schools around the world, I got used to teachers struggling with my name. There was always the awkward moment on the first day of school during attendance check when a new teacher got to my name on their student list and had to pause before reading it out loud with hesitation.........

I was meeting with a hiring manager, a middle-aged White man, to discuss potentially joining his team. Though we had previously met and corresponded via email, he did not remember my name, nor did I expect him to since it was recruitment season and he had probably met with dozens of candidates by that point.

At the start of the interview, he looked down at my CV for a quick reference so he could address me. He looked up and after an attempt at my name asked, "Is there another name you go by?" Naturally, I said, "You can call me Fermín." His response was "We're going to have to come up with an easier name for you. How about we call you Fred?"

I am ashamed to say that I did not immediately ask to leave the meeting. Instead, I chuckled awkwardly and tried to move the conversation forward by focusing on the nature of the job. After being offered the job, I turned it down. Needless to say, I could not imagine working with someone who could not be bothered to learn my name because what he was really telling me was that he did not care about who I was as a person.

Unfortunately, this experience is not that uncommon for members of the Asian and Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. We are constantly being asked to anglicize or simplify our names.

For my Indian friends, Kamran becomes Cameron, and Aran becomes Aaron. For my Hong Kong friends, they either have an English name, or they will go by the initials of their given name (i.e. Kuan-lin would be KL). And when neither option works, many Asians will opt to adopt an English name out of convenience.

This is not to say that Asians and Asian Americans do not have English names that they are given at birth or that they prefer to use. In fact, many -- if not most -- of those born in the US probably have an English name as part of their legal name (and to ask if that is their "real name" is very othering)..............

Opinion: 'How about we call you Fred?' and other things I've heard about my Asian name (msn.com)
 

insidejob

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On Asian names

I've seen this happen both in school and work
===================================

For many of us Asians living in the West, our name is a tricky subject that often makes us feel self-conscious and embarrassed when people try to pronounce it. Growing up attending American international schools around the world, I got used to teachers struggling with my name. There was always the awkward moment on the first day of school during attendance check when a new teacher got to my name on their student list and had to pause before reading it out loud with hesitation.........

I was meeting with a hiring manager, a middle-aged White man, to discuss potentially joining his team. Though we had previously met and corresponded via email, he did not remember my name, nor did I expect him to since it was recruitment season and he had probably met with dozens of candidates by that point.

At the start of the interview, he looked down at my CV for a quick reference so he could address me. He looked up and after an attempt at my name asked, "Is there another name you go by?" Naturally, I said, "You can call me Fermín." His response was "We're going to have to come up with an easier name for you. How about we call you Fred?"

I am ashamed to say that I did not immediately ask to leave the meeting. Instead, I chuckled awkwardly and tried to move the conversation forward by focusing on the nature of the job. After being offered the job, I turned it down. Needless to say, I could not imagine working with someone who could not be bothered to learn my name because what he was really telling me was that he did not care about who I was as a person.

Unfortunately, this experience is not that uncommon for members of the Asian and Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. We are constantly being asked to anglicize or simplify our names.

For my Indian friends, Kamran becomes Cameron, and Aran becomes Aaron. For my Hong Kong friends, they either have an English name, or they will go by the initials of their given name (i.e. Kuan-lin would be KL). And when neither option works, many Asians will opt to adopt an English name out of convenience.

This is not to say that Asians and Asian Americans do not have English names that they are given at birth or that they prefer to use. In fact, many -- if not most -- of those born in the US probably have an English name as part of their legal name (and to ask if that is their "real name" is very othering)..............

Opinion: 'How about we call you Fred?' and other things I've heard about my Asian name (msn.com)
I'd have replied, "Actually, Fred says fork you and your stupid racist arse. I'll find a job somewhere else."

The friend I was talking about that post earlier goes by a name that isn't her given name but not because she was forced to and the name she goes by is definitely not a Jane or Mary kind of name. I think it's actually a family nickname kind of thing that is common in her family because her sister did/does the same thing. Both of their "nicknames" happen to be much shorter and easier to pronounce, but I'd actually say that they are more uncommon than their birth names. It's weird now because she's a realtor and her business cards have her real name on them and some of her clients use it and some use the other. I'm going to have to ask her how it happens that she gives some of her clients the name she uses while not giving it to others.
 

Optimus Prime

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Perfect response to the "where are you from?" question

....When I’m asked where I’m from, I reply (with a big smile), “Are you asking where I live, was born, raised, or are you asking about my ethnicity?” This bluntness always takes them by surprise, and they stumble around a bit. So I come to their rescue and tell them about my heritage, of which I’m quite proud....

Letters to the Editor: I had no idea I shouldn't ask Asian Americans 'where they're from.' I'll stop immediately (msn.com)
 
OP
Farb

Farb

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https://www.foxnews.com/us/nypd-sea...brutally-beating-asian-woman-on-way-to-church

Some how I get the feeling that that suspect was a Trump fan or white supremacist.

What causes 'men' to stand by and watch someone attack an elderly woman? This is about the security guard who closed the doors as the assault began.
Is this more of the 'I don't want to get involved' mentality or is it a sign of people just not having conviction to do what is right any longer? Is our society too broken to even see the wrong in attacking our elderly?
 

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