Increasing racist attacks on Asian (1 Viewer)

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Farb

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/02/09/attacks-asian-american-elderly-/

I will admit, I didn't know anything about these these strings of attacks and the murder of elderly Asian American out west. Really disturbing. In most cases, they have caught sub human scum that have committed these crimes.
In the case of the murder of Ratanapakdee, I sincerely hope the death penalty will be sought, although that is not possible in the state of CA.
 

brandon

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How does this have to do with Asian hate crimes when the victim was black and the perp was white?
I'm assuming you won't read this since I think I'm on your ignore list, but...

The general increase in white nationalism, directly attributable to the rhetoric of the previous president, is a contributing factor to the rise in Asian hate crimes.
 

Bigdaddysaints

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How does this have to do with Asian hate crimes when the victim was black and the perp was white?
brandon said:
I'm assuming you won't read this since I think I'm on your ignore list, but...

The general increase in white nationalism, directly attributable to the rhetoric of the previous president, is a contributing factor to the rise in Asian hate crimes.
It shows this stuff is alive and well. I don't think Illinois Nazis keep it just black people.
Plus, it doesn't really warrant its own thread.
 
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Farb

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It shows this stuff is alive and well. I don't think Illinois Nazis keep it just black people.
Plus, it doesn't really warrant its own thread.
Hate is very much alive and well in this country, I am just not convinced it is just whitey doing all the hate.

Maybe there should be a separate thread for folks to post articles that show hate crimes or perceived hate crimes against different races?
 

Nebaghead

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Hate is very much alive and well in this country, I am just not convinced it is just whitey doing all the hate.

Maybe there should be a separate thread for folks to post articles that show hate crimes or perceived hate crimes against different races?
Not all but a majority are white on other races.

Of the 6,406 known offenders:

52.5% were White
23.9% were Black or African American
14.6% race unknown

2019 statistics From https://www.justice.gov/hatecrimes/hate-crime-statistics
 

zztop

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Something I've been thinking about lately is during WW2 after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, the US basically rounded up 150,000-ish Japanese US citizens and put them in prison camps. Wonder if this would fall under racism or xenophobia. I guess the simple answer would be both.
 

Optimus Prime

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Absolutely terrible
=======================
Mourning has been especially painful for the family Byong Choi left behind.

The 83-year-old retired accountant and restaurateur died of tuberculosis in his bone marrow on Feb. 24 in Orange County, Calif., but his wife and four daughters couldn’t hold a funeral Mass in his honor until March 19 because of coronavirus restrictions.

That date will now leave an indelible mark on a family coping with loss but is also a bleak reminder of how insidious anti-Asian racism can be.

The following Monday, Byong Choi’s wife, Yong, 82, received a handwritten, cursive letter at her Leisure World Seal Beach retirement community home postmarked the same date as the funeral. It read, “Now that Byong is gone makes it one less Asian to put up with in Leisure World. You fricken Asians are taking over our American community!”

The letter arrived just days after a 21-year-old White man killed eight people, six of whom were Asian women, which raised fears among Asian American communities nationwide.....................

After their father’s death came a handwritten note: ‘One less Asian to put up with’ (msn.com)
 

Optimus Prime

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completely unsurprising
====================
As the coronavirus spread across the globe last February, the World Health Organization urged people to avoid terms like the “Wuhan virus” or the “Chinese virus,” fearing it could spike a backlash against Asians.

President Donald Trump didn’t take the advice. On March 16, 2020, he first tweeted the phrase “Chinese virus.”
That single tweet, researchers later found, fueled exactly the kind of backlash the WHO had feared: It was followed by an avalanche of tweets using the hashtag #chinesevirus, among other anti-Asian phrases.

“The week before Trump’s tweet the dominant term [on Twitter] was #covid-19,” Yulin Hswen, an epidemiology professor at the University of California at San Francisco and a co-author of the study, told The Washington Post. “The week after his tweet, it was #chinesevirus.”

Hswen is among a group of researchers who analyzed hundreds of thousands of #covid-19 and #chinesevirus hashtags drafted the week before and after Trump first referred to the coronavirus as the “Chinese virus” on the social media platform.

Not only did more people use the #chinesevirus hashtag days after Trump’s tweet, but those who did were more likely to include other anti-Asian hashtags in their tweets, according to the peer-reviewed study published by the American Journal of Public Health on Thursday...............

Anti-Asian hashtags spiked after Trump first tweeted ‘Chinese virus,’ study finds - The Washington Post
 

Optimus Prime

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More about what has been happening the last year
==================================
.................To provide some context for the range of discrimination that’s been experienced — and show what Asian Americans have been facing as they walk down the street or make a quick stop at the grocery store in towns and cities across America — here are some accounts that have been reported to Stop AAPI Hate, in people’s own words. (Please note that these accounts include language that may be disturbing.)

MARIETTA, Georgia “I was in line at the pharmacy when a woman approached me and sprayed Lysol all over me. She was yelling, ‘You’re the infection. Go home. We don’t want you here!’ I was in shock and cried as I left the building. No one came to my help.”

LAS VEGAS“A [ride-hailing service] driver said to me after I got into his car, ‘Damn, another Asian riding with me today, I hope you don’t have any Covid.’ He was leaning as much as he could against the driver’s door with his head tilted toward the window, implying he doesn’t want to be close to me while I am sitting diagonally behind him as a rider. After I told him, ‘Have a good day,’ he replied back, ‘You shouldn’t be requesting any more rides from anybody.’”

SAN FRANCISCO — “I was standing in an aisle at [a hardware store] when suddenly I was struck from behind. Video surveillance verified the incident in which a white male using his bent elbow struck my upper back. Subsequent verbal attacks occurred with him saying, ‘Shut up, you Monkey!’ ‘F--k you, Chinaman,’ ‘Go back to China,’ and ‘...bringing that Chinese virus over here.’”

CUPERTINO, California — “I was shouted [at] and harassed by the cashier, workers, as well as customers to get out of the store. They said, ‘You Chinese bring the virus here and you dare ask people to keep social distance guidelines.’”

LOS ANGELES — “I was at our local park with my mom, taking our daily walk. We both, of course, had our masks on. When we started walking up and down the flight of stairs we always do reps on, this lady that was on the opposite side of us with her husband, she kept making racist remarks to both me and my mom. For example, ‘Get off these steps, do you know about the Chinese disease,’ and she even referred to me as ‘Asian boy.’”

AUSTIN, Texas — “My son (9 years old) was on a summer camp field trip to [a pizza restaurant]. While there, a girl from his camp group told him that all Chinese people have the coronavirus. She said that Asians brought the virus. Then she proceeded to get the other kids to play a game called ‘corona touch’ and said that he had the ‘corona touch.’ The constant insults ended up making him cry. The camp counselors stepped in at that point to stop her.”

CLIFFSIDE, New Jersey — “My elderly grandparents (Korean) were taking our 1-year-old daughter for a walk in her stroller. A group of young men followed them, yelling that they had coronavirus. They were scared to engage (especially since they had a baby with them) and just kept walking until eventually the men lost interest and went away.”

SPRECKELS, California — “Some young men came by in a white pickup, slowed down, and one of them yelled, ‘Hey Ch**k! Take your virus and go back where you came from!’”

SANTA CLARA, California — “A man kicked my dog and told me to shut my dog up and then spat at me, saying, ‘Take your disease that’s ruining our country and go home.’”.................

Anti-Asian racism has been overlooked for a long time. It’s now reached a boiling point. (msn.com)
 

Bigdaddysaints

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I have no doubt majority of those people above who did those things have 2 things in common..
I remember seeing this about 10 years ago, this thread made me look it up.
 
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Optimus Prime

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I have no doubt majority of those people above who did those things have 2 things in common..
I remember seeing this about 10 years ago, this thread made me look it up.
I hadn't seen that before. Article about this
=============================

If you are Asian in America, you have gone through life being asked the seemingly harmless question, “Where are you from?”

News flash, it’s not harmless.

I promise you, every member of the Asian American community cringes inside when they are asked that question.

I’m sure people asking don’t think of it as an expression of racism or bias. They don’t’ mean it to be. They’re just curious. They’ve undoubtedly repeated this thoughtless exercise numerous times. They’ve likely received a polite and succinct answer that would not set off any internal alarm bells.

I can tell you firsthand that by now, I've gotten my answer down to a succinct 30 seconds. It’s like an automatic reflex and frankly, it’s just easier than expending the energy required to explain why it’s a demonstration of passive racism to ask me in the first place. In choosing avoidance over confrontation, I realize now that I have inadvertently contributed to the “model minority” stereotype by holding my tongue...............

CNN’s senior national correspondent Kyung Lah added, “Try never telling them where you’re from. It’s my conversation sport with people because I’ve really been over it for a while now. Where are you from? Chicago. Where are you really from? The NW suburbs. Where are your parents from? They live in Orange County.”

This is the same progression of questions all of us who look Asian have dealt with for our entire lives.

If you’re white in America and your name is Joe, Kevin, Karen or Jennifer, when you meet someone for the first time, you aren’t asked, “Where are you from?” or “Where is your family from?” When you’re Asian American, it’s routine.

Why is it that within 60 seconds of meeting me for the first time, some feel that they must know my life story and family history? Why does it even matter?

Many of you reading this might be thinking, “I’ve done this” or “I was genuinely curious where you were from.” That might be true. But ask yourself if you’ve felt this way about the countless white people whose paths you’ve crossed. Have you had the same impulse to ask them those questions within 30 seconds of meeting them?............

Op-Ed: The question every Asian American hates to be asked: 'Where are you from?' (msn.com)
 

samiam5211

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I hadn't seen that before. Article about this
=============================

If you are Asian in America, you have gone through life being asked the seemingly harmless question, “Where are you from?”

News flash, it’s not harmless.

I promise you, every member of the Asian American community cringes inside when they are asked that question.

I’m sure people asking don’t think of it as an expression of racism or bias. They don’t’ mean it to be. They’re just curious. They’ve undoubtedly repeated this thoughtless exercise numerous times. They’ve likely received a polite and succinct answer that would not set off any internal alarm bells.

I can tell you firsthand that by now, I've gotten my answer down to a succinct 30 seconds. It’s like an automatic reflex and frankly, it’s just easier than expending the energy required to explain why it’s a demonstration of passive racism to ask me in the first place. In choosing avoidance over confrontation, I realize now that I have inadvertently contributed to the “model minority” stereotype by holding my tongue...............

CNN’s senior national correspondent Kyung Lah added, “Try never telling them where you’re from. It’s my conversation sport with people because I’ve really been over it for a while now. Where are you from? Chicago. Where are you really from? The NW suburbs. Where are your parents from? They live in Orange County.”

This is the same progression of questions all of us who look Asian have dealt with for our entire lives.

If you’re white in America and your name is Joe, Kevin, Karen or Jennifer, when you meet someone for the first time, you aren’t asked, “Where are you from?” or “Where is your family from?” When you’re Asian American, it’s routine.

Why is it that within 60 seconds of meeting me for the first time, some feel that they must know my life story and family history? Why does it even matter?

Many of you reading this might be thinking, “I’ve done this” or “I was genuinely curious where you were from.” That might be true. But ask yourself if you’ve felt this way about the countless white people whose paths you’ve crossed. Have you had the same impulse to ask them those questions within 30 seconds of meeting them?............

Op-Ed: The question every Asian American hates to be asked: 'Where are you from?' (msn.com)
I always ask people where they are from (even white people) when i first meet them. I thought that was a normal thing.

Maybe that comes from growing up in a rural area, and always living in places other than where i am "from", and i assume no one else is living where they are from.

I will continue to ask people where they are from when i first meet them, except now i probably won't ask an Asian looking person that question. Not sure if that makes the world a better place or not.
 

Bigdaddysaints

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Also, one that people do that is mostly irrelevant, is when telling a story and saying something like my coworker (or friend or neighbor) who is black, (asian or mexican) blah blah blah.. Unless you trying to describe that person for a reason it makes no sense. I hear this all the time, Most of the time if it involves a non white person, its not just a story about Joe, its a story about Joe, who is black.
 

brandon

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I always ask people where they are from (even white people) when i first meet them. I thought that was a normal thing.

Maybe that comes from growing up in a rural area, and always living in places other than where i am "from", and i assume no one else is living where they are from.

I will continue to ask people where they are from when i first meet them, except now i probably won't ask an Asian looking person that question. Not sure if that makes the world a better place or not.
That's possible, as asking someone where there from does typically come up in conversation (though I would argue that it usually comes up later in conversation when dealing with a white person than someone of Asian descent).

And the difference is that when the white person says "I'm from San Diego," you say "oh, that's cool," not "yea, but where are you REALLY from? Where are you parents from?"
 

DaveXA

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That's possible, as asking someone where there from does typically come up in conversation (though I would argue that it usually comes up later in conversation when dealing with a white person than someone of Asian descent).

And the difference is that when the white person says "I'm from San Diego," you say "oh, that's cool," not "yea, but where are you REALLY from? Where are you parents from?"
I dunno, most of the time when meeting someone new, I get asked where I'm from and I'm white. It's always been pretty routine in my interactions with all kinds of people. I get why this thought might pop up after reading the article, but my wife is Asian and she never had an issue with people asking where she's from. To her, it's just part of a random normal conversation with people we meet. Never thought anything of it tbh.
 

Optimus Prime

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I dunno, most of the time when meeting someone new, I get asked where I'm from and I'm white. It's always been pretty routine in my interactions with all kinds of people. I get why this thought might pop up after reading the article, but my wife is Asian and she never had an issue with people asking where she's from. To her, it's just part of a random normal conversation with people we meet. Never thought anything of it tbh.
Like Brandon said it depends on what happens afterwards

If your wife is asked and says Vienna Virginia, is that the end of it or are more questions asked

And with so many things some are asking out of a genuine innocent curiosity and with others there can be an edge or agenda
 

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