Good Order and Discipline - US Military (1 Viewer)

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DJ1BigTymer

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This past month, POTUS has granted clemency for three US Servicemen convicted of war crimes. As a retired serviceman, I find it reprehensible that these criminals have been granted clemency, it's a slap in the face of those that served honorably and it also place the lives of those that are still in the line of fire in increased danger. IMO, trump's actions has undermined the UCMJ by turning a blind eye to crimes that were committed by these three and has embolden those who may take further transgressions.


President Donald Trump on Friday granted clemency to three controversial military figures embroiled in charges of war crimes, arguing the moves will give troops “the confidence to fight” without worrying about potential legal overreach.
Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance, convicted of second degree murder in the death of three Afghans, was given a full pardon from president for the crimes. Army Maj. Mathew Golsteyn, who faced murder charges next year for a similar crime, was also given a full pardon for those alleged offenses.
Special Warfare Operator Chief Edward Gallagher, who earlier this fall was acquitted of a string of alleged war crimes, had his rank restored to Chief Petty Officer by the president.
In another instance of trump undermining our military leaders, he has reversed the Navy's decision to demote and remove CPO Edward Gallagher from the Navy Seals.

Heres some backround on CPO Gallagher:

Gallagher also attracted controversies and investigations, although few formal reprimands. He was the subject in an investigation of the shooting of a young girl in Afghanistan in 2010, but was cleared of wrongdoing in it.[6] He also allegedly tried to run over a Navy police officer with his car in 2014 after being detained at a traffic stop.[5] By 2015, Gallagher had acquired a reputation as someone who was more interested in fighting terrorists and less interested in compliance with rules.[5] In his eighth deployment in 2017, Gallagher's aggressive side was seemingly amplified, especially during the Battle for Mosul, wherein the US force mission was intended to be more advisory than direct combat. Gallagher was the subject of a number of reports from his fellow SEAL team members of actions not in keeping with the rules of war, but initially these reports were dismissed by the SEAL command structure.[6] Only after the reports were escalated outside the SEALs were they acted upon and directed to the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS).[5] On September 11, 2018, Gallagher was arrested at Camp Pendleton and charged with premeditated murder, attempted murder, obstruction of justice, and other offenses.[3] On October 18, Lieutenant Jacob Portier of Gallagher's platoon was also charged with failing to properly escalate to his superiors in the chain of command as well as destroying evidence.[7][5] Gallagher pleaded not guilty to all the charges against him.

Anyone in the Navy can spot a SEAL by the gold insignia pinned to his chest: an eagle on an anchor, clutching a flintlock pistol and a trident. It is the badge of an elite band of warriors, one of the most revered in the military.

The pin, known as the Trident, represents the grit of sailors who made it through some of the toughest training in the Navy, and are given some of the riskiest missions. It stands for fidelity and sacrifice. Even in death, the pin plays a role: SEALs pound their pins into the wood of fallen comrades’ caskets.

This week, the Trident became a symbol of defiance.

Chief Petty Officer Edward Gallagher wore his pin when he reported to work on Thursday at Naval Base Coronado near San Diego. But that pin, and Chief Gallagher’s 14-year SEAL career, had become the focus of an epic clash between President Trump and the Navy.

Mr. Trump said in a Twitter post on Thursday that he would be personally intervening in a disciplinary proceeding, to ensure that the chief keeps his Trident pin — an exceedingly rare step by a president that undercut the authority of the SEALs leadership.
 

The moose

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I personally think this is one of the worst things he has done.

In the regular world you a judged by peers but it is not necessarily so.

In the military you are judged truly by your peers. If that is what is handed down so be it.

He should keep his nose out of a system he was too scared to be a part of.
 
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DJ1BigTymer

DJ1BigTymer

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The SEALS case really bothers me because it was his teammates that repeatedly raise alarms about Gallagher's actions in the field and their leaders turned a blind eye. It wasn't until the prisoner stabbing that they took action. I followed this case, and there was a lot of shadiness going on by both sides, culminating with another teammate claiming responsibility after he was granted immunity.

Either way, Navy brass deemed it necessary to demote and boot Gallagher from the SEALS. If I were the Admiral that made that decision, I would find it very hard to be able to continue my command after being undermined by POTUS.
 

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